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Thread: Team Canada vs Team USA in New Zealand?

  1. #51
    IHF Member BillyCanuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azzy77 View Post
    Teams will include players of various levels including but not exclusive to pro and semi pro leagues from all over North America. ‘We will use our best endeavors to provide accurate information relating to players in these invitational teams,when such information is released, but expect understanding from ticket buyers in circumstances where changes cannot be avoided, such as player injury or legal obligations’ says Gareth Webber.

    This paragraph here virtually is saying Kyle Quincey and Rob Schremp aren't coming. I infer this because no other players have been named yet, so it can't apply to other players. As stated before the other players will only be named 2 days before they land, so I doubt injury and legal obligations will hit them. Also note they don't explicitly say NHL anymore. Also the players aren't necessarily from a Pro or a semi-pro league, meaning any bozo with hockey stick can play
    That is the key word there, 'legal obligation'. Like you said, that means no NHL and even AHL active player will be attending this event because they are contractually obligated to not play hockey outside of their contracts unless it is for international duty with an IIHF sanctioned event.

    So NZ could see guys who are playing in the Federal Hockey League (if they can afford to pay for the trip down there), ex-pro's, junior A tier 3, Junior B, and beer leaguers. Awesome, is that worth the $145 ticket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Azzy77 View Post
    If you have any friends you want to introduce to hockey, this is the perfect opportunity. ‘With 20,000 seats to fill, we're not just here for the existing hockey market... We're here for the people who haven't even seen a game. We'll be educating the
    crowd about the rules, and playing 'Hockey 101' clips to explain what's going on’.
    This event will blow your mind! If you want the American Hockey Experience, these are the events to see!

    Again nothing to convince me, that I am wrong in thinking this will be poor quality hockey with nice trimmings.
    What gives with the American Hockey Experience? Canadians offer a great hockey experience. Why not just say North American hockey experience?

    These promoters seem to know NOTHING about hockey. With all this money they are sinking into the event, you think they would hire somebody with hockey knowledge.

    This event would be better if they just partnered with the Canadian Hockey League and the United States Hockey League and had them bring select teams down. The level of play would be a million times better then what they are going to get now and it would be fast, hard hitting, entertaining hockey.

    My final thought is this:

  2. #52
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    http://tvnz.co.nz/othersports-news/4...owdown-4143179

    $4.2 million rink for NZ showdown

    Published: 10:17AM Wednesday April 27, 2011 Source: ONE Sport

    $4.2 million rink set for NZ shores - Source: Douglas Webber Group

    $4.2 million ice rink is to be imported into New Zealand from Amsterdam to host the number one and two ice hockey nations in the world.

    Three exhibition games between the USA and Canada will be held in Auckland, Christchurch and Dunedin and will be the biggest games this country has seen of the winter sport.

    The two top-flight hockey nations will battle it out in the specially imported ice rink this July and August. The 60 by 30 metre portable ice rink, which holds 250,000 litres of water, is to be specially imported for the three-match series.

    Up to 50 staff will be employed to set up the giant rink, which will take 48 hours and cost $2000 a day to maintain while in New Zealand.

    The director of Douglas Webber Events, Craig Douglas, says the rink is the largest of its kind in the world and will be transported throughout the country in nine 40-foot containers.

    The three games will attract an estimated 25,000 spectators and Douglas says they will witness more than just ice hockey.

    "Sound and lighting effects, pyrotechnics and flame-throwers are just the beginning. Sports fans will witness all the action and aggression live on the big screen, with slow motion replays, getting up close and personal."

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    Douglas says it is hard to grasp the enormity of these world class hockey countries, which sell out stadiums of 20,000 people every night.

    "For these players to come here to New Zealand is a massive privilege. The infamous rivalry between these two nations won't be left at home."

    The games will be held in Auckland's Vector Arena on July 23, Christchurch CBS Canterbury Arena on July 30 and the Dunedin Ice Stadium on August 3.

    All games will be filmed for international television and screened in New Zealand, Canada, the United States and Australia.

  3. #53
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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  4. #54
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    And different article here - with different spin -

    http://www.3news.co.nz/ChCh-quake-pu...8/Default.aspx

    ChCh quake puts off ice hockey players
    3 comments | Post Comment Email Print Text Size: aA aA aA

    ChCh quake puts off ice hockey players

    WED, 27 APR 2011 6:34P.M. By Jessica Rowe

    Professional ice hockey players from North America nearly pulled out of an exhibition game in Christchurch, following the February earthquake.

    The American and Canadian ice hockey teams are due to play exhibition matches in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch in July. However, after the earthquake they're no longer so keen on Christchurch.
    "Well obviously they are afraid of what they see on TV," says event promoter Craig Douglas. "Back in North America they see a devastated Christchurch and they think they will come here and it will be like a third world city."
    With the players worth millions, the National Hockey League is insisting the players spend as little time in Christchurch as possible.
    So the team will leave Wellington on a charter flight, just hours before the July 30 game. Afterwards they will get just a few minutes to shower and change before flying back the same evening.
    Around 150 events have been cancelled since the February earthquake, including Christchurch's Rugby World Cup games. The ambassador for ice hockey in North America, Kerry Goulet, says it was a battle to get the teams to come here at all.
    "We've seen horrific pictures over there and as any human you want to be confident that you are in a secure zone," he says. "And when we saw those pictures we did have to explain earthquakes are a norm around the world."
    But Mr Goulet is unphased and will arrive in May to assess the situation and try to convince the players to stay here a little longer.
    3 News

  5. #55
    IHF Staff Marc Brunengraber's Avatar
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    Since when are Canada and the US ranked #1 and #2 in the world?

    Also, the article seems to say NHL players are coming, and we have no idea of that is true or not.

    Seems like the New Zealand public is being sold on a fraud........unless the NHL players really do end up coming.

  6. #56
    IHF Member BillyCanuck's Avatar
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    Nobody in Canada thinks Christchurch is a 'third world city'. This promoter is trying to create hype about the event by putting negative spins on North American views how New Zealand is after the quake. General poll in my office concludes that Christchurch is rebuilding and is safe to visit. Maybe the promoter is confusing Canada's view on Japan with Christchurch?

    Unfortunately people in New Zealand really have no idea what we North American's are viewing New Zealand as.

    Pretty shocked to see this
    With the players worth millions, the National Hockey League is insisting the players spend as little time in Christchurch as possible.
    Would love to see the NHL comment on this. I like how it just says 'National Hockey League'; not the 'spoke person from the NHL' or ' Joe Blow, media relations director from the NHL'.

  7. #57
    IHF Member Ref72's Avatar
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    this whole thing is a fraud and has been from day 1. Too many unanswered questions, and promises that significantly exceed reality

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    The promoters have asked NZIHL imports to fill their small rosters and are using the imports for promotional material. Certainly not the best players to play on our shores as the promoters suggest since we already have them in our leagues. The promoter even told one of the NZIHL imports that "I don't care about hockey, I'm in it for the money". Private conversation isn't very private when you are in a country as small as ours.

    Although mentioned earlier, most in the know about ice hockey in NZ are aware of the debate about the game. I'm still amazed though how many members of the public ask me if I'm going to the Team Canada/USA game once they learn I'm involved in hockey. The public is certainly being duped.

  9. #59
    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    No doubt, and frankly this was expected from the start (at least among membrs of this forum).
    That being said, while it may not be the highest level of play that you could find, it seems to me that it's still a great promotion for the game of ice hockey in a country where it's still a small (although growing) sport.

  10. #60
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    More Press on the Upcoming Exhibition Games in NZ

    from http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news...ectid=10727312

    Ice Hockey: Exhibition is not just here for fast puck
    By Michael Burgess 5:30 AM Sunday May 22, 2011

    Vancouver Canucks and San Jose Sharks in Game 2 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoffs. Photo / Getty Images
    The puck will stop here. Ice hockey may be a foreign sport to most of us but the upcoming international exhibition has captured the imagination of Kiwi punters, if ticket sales are any indication.

    The three-game series is between a USA selection and a composite Canadian team and will be staged in the country's three biggest indoor arenas in Auckland, Christchurch and Dunedin.

    The match at Vector Arena on July 23 has virtually sold out, with the last batch of 500 tickets released for sale yesterday. The 4000-seat Dunedin Ice Stadium is 60 per cent sold already while the 8900 seat CBS Arena in Christchurch is over 50 per cent sold, with strong early sales stalled after some uncertainty in the wake of the February earthquake.

    The term 'exhibition' suggests the razzle dazzle and hype of the Harlem Globetrotters, but organisers stress that most of the players will be drawn from the NHL, with former Stanley Cup winners.

    "There is no such thing as a friendly between the USA and Canada," says International Ice Hockey Hall of Famer Kerry Goulet, who has been responsible for assembling the two teams.


    "We have put together a mix of established stars and up-and-coming talent to ensure the right mix of desire and hunger."

    Superstars of the sport like Sidney Crosby (who scored the winner in the final of the Winter Olympics and earns an annual salary of US$8 million) will not be making the trip; players of his ilk would cost $100,000-$200,000 in insurance costs alone.

    But Goulet is satisfied with the group of players he is putting together: "We are talking millions of dollars of talent, and the best hockey players ever seen in this part of the world."

    The USA team will be captained by Aaron Miller, while the Canadian skipper is Derek Armstrong. Miller spent most of his career with the Colorado Avalanche and the Los Angeles Kings in a 700-game NHL career and also won a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

    "We all can't wait to show Kiwis the fastest sport on the planet," says Miller. Players hurl down the ice at speeds of over 60km/h, while the fastest slapshot can see the puck whizz through the air at 160km/h.

    Armstrong suited up for almost 500 games in the NHL, turning out for the Kings, New York Rangers and St Louis Blues among others. US Goaltender John Grahame is another big name, who represented the US at the 2006 Winter Olympics and also was part of a Stanley Cup winning team in 2004.

    Along with Russia, the USA and Canada remain the powerhouses of the sport, and fought out a memorable final in the last Winter Olympics. Canada has over 577,000 registered players - nearly two per cent of the population - while there are almost half a million players in the USA. New Zealand has 1510 registered players.

    The logistics behind bringing a full-sized, NHL ice rink to New Zealand has occupied the best part of three years of planning for the event promoters. While assembling a quality field of players and meeting the contractual demands of the agents and the NHL has been a challenge, it pales in comparison with the task of getting the $4.2 million rink to this country.

    It has been sourced from a company in Amsterdam, and is currently being shipped to New Zealand. Set to arrive in three weeks, the component parts fill nine shipping containers.

    Once assembled it will be 56m long by 26m wide and require 200,000 litres of water. It takes approximately 50 hours to assemble the skeleton structure, and then another 72 hours to freeze the water. The rink requires around 23cm of ice.

    In 2012 event director Craig Douglas plans to take the rink to Australia, where he will stage an international ice hockey series across five cities. He hopes that Kiwi fans will leave the arena wanting to watch the local product the next week.

    For more information go to http://www.internationalicehockey.co.nz

    By Michael Burgess | Email Michael

  11. #61
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Summer skating on ice rink

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/ar...ectid=10727252

    Summer skating on ice rink
    By Michael Burgess 5:30 AM Sunday May 22, 2011

    NHL-style fun. Photo / Supplied

    Forget sunbathing - this summer Aucklanders will have the chance to ice-skate in the city centre.

    Aotea Square will resemble New York's Central Park as a full sized NHL-style rink, measuring 56m by 26m, is installed in January.

    The rink requires 200,000 litres of water, which will take up to 72 hours to freeze - and after six weeks it will be melted.

    The water has to be melted so the rink can be shifted. It will spend six weeks in Christchurch's Hagley Park this winter, another six weeks on Wellington's waterfront during the Rugby World Cup and the same period in Hamilton's Garden Square, before reaching Auckland.

    Promoters say a similar rink was installed successfully in Dubai. "Generators keep the ice chilled and it is just a matter of turning it up a bit to cope with Auckland's summer humidity," says Christchurch-based event promoter Craig Douglas.

    The structure, valued at $4.2 million, is being shipped from Amsterdam. The upcoming three-match ice hockey series will be played on the rink in July (one match each in Auckland, Christchurch and Dunedin), before the rink is opened to the public.


    Promoters are opening the rink to the public to offset some of the costs of bringing it to New Zealand for the competition series between exhibition NHL teams representing the United States and Canada.

  12. #62
    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Sounds like it's ex-NHLers rather than current ones, if Aaron Miller and Derek Armstrong are involved
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

  13. #63
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    Is Kerry Goulet actually in the Hockey Hall of Fame?? I can't find his name anywhere?

    I would be genuinely interested to know if he is actually and inductee, or he means he visited it one time?

  14. #64
    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    He is an inductee of the Hockey Hall Of Fame.... that is to say, the CANADIAN BALL HOCKEY Hall of Fame.
    Also, I'll still be surprised if there are any current NHLers on either roster (or, for that matter, anyone with an active AHL or Elite European contract)

  15. #65
    IHF Member BillyCanuck's Avatar
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    A buddy of mine ran into Aaron Miller recently. Great guy, but definitely RETIRED from playing competitive hockey.

    This event is not what the promoter is hyping it to be. It is not going to be a heated international rivalry like a typical Canada vs USA match.

    This is an exhibition series. I will fall off my chair if a CURRENT NHL player suits up for this event, but that is not going to happen.

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    I heard about this on the radio on Wednesday, and thought it sounded to good to be true, but when i heard who was running it , i knew it was to good to be true.
    Craig Douglas is dodgy at best. He has run events in Hawkes Bay in the past, and left a lot of people out of pocket. This includes sound engineers, lighting riggers, and a lot of local suppliers that here promises to pay.
    He also promises so much more than he delivers.
    http://www.hawkesbaytoday.co.nz/loca...izzer/3687067/
    yes it was 5 years ago, but he hasn't shown his head around here again.
    He did the same thing with the "krusty demons" running events just after the real events and tagging on to the names, he got into big trouble with the real tour management. And again left without paying a lot of people.

  17. #67
    IHF Member BillyCanuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redal View Post
    I heard about this on the radio on Wednesday, and thought it sounded to good to be true, but when i heard who was running it , i knew it was to good to be true.
    Craig Douglas is dodgy at best. He has run events in Hawkes Bay in the past, and left a lot of people out of pocket. This includes sound engineers, lighting riggers, and a lot of local suppliers that here promises to pay.
    He also promises so much more than he delivers.
    http://www.hawkesbaytoday.co.nz/loca...izzer/3687067/
    yes it was 5 years ago, but he hasn't shown his head around here again.
    He did the same thing with the "krusty demons" running events just after the real events and tagging on to the names, he got into big trouble with the real tour management. And again left without paying a lot of people.
    Sounds like he is hyping up another big event that could turn into a "fizzer."

    I could get excited for this event if it was raising money for a charity or to help rebuild damage from the earthquake. Then you would get a great turnout.

    My hometown in Penticton used to have a charity hockey game in the summer to raise money for a scholarship foundation. It was great! Andy Moog, Paul Kariya, Glenn Anderson, Greg Adams and many other NHL players and celebrities would play. Great hockey, and a sellout crowd every time.

    Mr.Douglas is only concerned about $$$$$ for himself. Honestly, when the players are PAYING to be in this event, you know it is a scam!

  18. #68
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news...ectid=10740496

    Event seemed to go down well with the packed Vector arena.

    Ice Hockey: American rivals a big hit with crowd By Michael Burgess 5:30 AM Sunday Jul 24, 2011
    Aaron Miller and Canada's Adrian Veideman do battle. Photo / AP

    It wasn't the NHL - but last night's hockey spectacular between US and Canadian selections is as close as we will see in New Zealand.

    Ice Hockey purists may disagree but the exhibition match delivered a quality spectacle in front of a noisy crowd of 10,000 fans in Vector Arena.

    There were some brilliant goals as well as outstanding goaltending from both custodians and some collisions worthy of the sport at the highest level.

    The match ended 3-3 in normal time, with Canada eventually prevailing in a lengthy penalty shootout.

    One particular body check by US captain Aaron Miller was bone crunching, while in the second half three players smashed head on into the Canadian goal, slamming the goal clean off its foundations as the players flew into the wall.

    Canada dominated the first period to lead 2-0, but seemed to tire later in the match and the US scored three unanswered goals, on the back of some outstanding work in the net by US custodian John Grahame. Grahame, a former Stanley Cup winner, was one of the game's dominant figures along with Canadian captain Derek Armstrong.

    American forward Bates Battaglia was another to impress.

    There were elements that spelt exhibition though. In the final period while leading 3-2, the US forwards twice scooped shots wide when one on one with the goaltender.

    It seemed easier to score and perhaps indicated that Canada were destined to come back to 3-3 and force a penalty shootout - which they duly did.

    In the NHL there would be overtime - but the shootout, where the players skate from halfway before trying to beat the goaltender was the perfect way to end the evening.

    Last night was as much about entertainment as it was sport. Cheerleaders did backflips and somersaults in the narrow corridor between the stands and ice, while fireworks blasted off the ice in the darkened arena. The USA entered the rink to the strains of AC/DC's Back in Black, Canadian following soon as Where the Streets Have No Name rang out.

    Over the three-year development of the event, the promoters have fielded many questions about the credibility of the exercise. Would the exhibition matches been taken seriously by the players - or were they here for a holiday?

    As the game got under way the players seemed a little tentative and were noticeably slipping on parts of the ice where the fireworks had left ash chars on the ice. In the first five minutes the opposing captains Derek Armstrong and Aaron Miller downed sticks and dropped their gloves to line each other up. It seemed a little contrived - as if they were trying to prove they were fair dinkum - as they slugged awkward punches at each other while their team mates stood around watching.

    The play livened up soon after that - and a body check by Miller later on a Canadian took both players off their feet and was worthy of what you would see in the NHL.

    Canada were first to settle and had more of the early chances. After a series of excellent saves from US goaltender John Grahame, the deadlock was broken by the Maple Leafs in the seventh minute, forward Kevin Doell sliding the puck home after a clever assist from Armstrong. At one stage in the first period it was a three on three contest - as two players from each team were sent to the penalty box for fouls. Doell added a second five minutes later and only the outstanding reflexes of Grahame stopped the Canadians from notching two or three more.

    The US struggled on offence in the first stanza, though were noticeably lifted by Miller's ferocious hit.

    The second period saw a turnaround as fatigue began to take it's toll. In the NHL teams carry 22 players, allowing for four separate 'lines' of defence players and attackers, giving regular opportunities for rest in the frantic sport. In contrast last night there were just 11 players on each team, meaning players got half the normal rest.

    The American comeback started early in the second period, as they nailed a controversial goal through Battaglia. Further goals from Blake Barkwell and Nick Tuzzolino took the Americans into a 3-2 lead by the end of the second period. It could have been four - but Canadian goaltender Andrew Engelage defused a US penalty opportunity.

    As well as the ice hockey, there was plenty of action to watch. The "kiss cam" - where an in stadium camera zoomed in on couples - saw normally reserved Kiwis locking lips for the camera during the extended breaks between the three 20 minute periods. There was a spectacular climax with a marriage proposal in the aisle, also on camera and after a brief hesitation a positive reply.

    The series continues with a second game in Christchurch before the final match in Dunedin.

    By Michael Burgess | Email Michael

  19. #69
    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Interesting to see the calibre of some of the players involved... to be honest I hadn't expected to see those kinds of names on the rosters.
    That being said, it's too bad they're only playing two lines per side, you're losing a lot of momentum by the third period when guys don't have more rest. That being said, i guess they had trouble rounding up more guys of the appropriate talent level for a third line.

  20. #70
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/boxing/new...ectid=10740544

    Ice Hockey: Pucking good time on the ice By Michael Guerin 5:30 AM Sunday Jul 24, 2011

    Shane Cameron had a ringside seat. Photo / Michael Craig

    After breaking his hand in his boxing triumph on Friday, Shane Cameron should have had it on ice, but he opted instead for the ice hockey.

    Cameron and 10,000 other Kiwis got an abundance of biffo between two teams from Canada and the USA as they battled it out on a $4.2 million temporary ice rink at Auckland's Vector Arena.

    There was plenty of skill on display, as former National Hockey League players joined other professionals, but the crowd wasn't looking for skill. They came alive at the slightest hint of the fighting the sport is famous for.

    And they got it. The opposing captains dropped sticks and gloves in the first five minutes to engage in a fully fledged fist fight. Later, a brutal body check by Aaron Miller on an Canadian attacker sent both players flying into the air.

    In the second period, the rink resembled a WWF ring as, after another collision, two players smashed into the American goal, slamming it off its footing.

    "I'm loving it," Cameron said. "There are some big hits out there - you can see the contests are pretty serious. It's full on."

    But local fan Shaun King, who has represented New Zealand in roller hockey, was not entirely impressed with the game, commenting that it looked like the players were stuck in "second gear" during the first 20-minute period.

    Off the ice, a "kisscam" zoomed in on various spectators and encouraged them to lock lips for the big screen.

    And usually reserved New Zealanders got into the spirit. The highlight of the breaks in play was a marriage proposal when a man popped the question as the rest of the crowd watched live and bigger than life size.

    To his immense relief, his surprised companion eventually nodded her head as applause rang around the arena.

    The rink - which contains 200,000 litres of ice and was imported from Holland - is to be dismantled today and transported down the country for matches in Christchurch and Dunedin this week.
    By Michael Guerin | Email Michael

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    After all of the hype with this match I doubt it truly represented hockey and only was mainly done for making money by the promoters.

  22. #72
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Those I spoke to, who went to the "event" enjoyed it - the hockey lacked the teamwork intensity and tension (perhaps like the allstars games...) - but it was an enjoyable evening nevertheless - and had >10x people watching a game than the largest rink in NZ - that alone changes the atmosphere.

    If you can go to local NHL games or World Champs or even to games in the top league in your country (and that includes NZIHL) you may see a better game. Perhaps it has similarities to the Harlem Globetrotters vs NBA..

    The crowd seemed to relish the Canadian vs USA rivalry - must have been a lot of expats in the crowd - most of the Canadians I knew went - and wore their nations colours proudly.

    But the haters are still going to hate...

  23. #73
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-news/n...t-to-scenic-NZ

    Ice hockey shows owe debt to scenic NZ Last updated 05:00 24/07/2011

    Money talks but New Zealand's famous scenery was more of a drawcard than cash for some of the world's best ice hockey players.

    Christchurch events promoter Craig Douglas knew money wouldn't motivate highly paid stars of the game from the United States and Canada to commit to a three-game tour of this country, so he relied on showing them the country.

    The average NHL salary makes what top All Blacks earn look like chicken-feed, so Douglas knew he couldn't throw money at the players.

    Instead he decided to show them a good time.

    "We will take them to catch a fish at Taupo, we will throw them out of an airplane, and from a bridge in Queenstown, and we'll have a hangi.

    "If this was Iraq, this would never happen – but New Zealand is a really easy place to sell," he says.

    While that would normally be true, the Christchurch earthquakes made it more difficult.

    On the day of the February quake, Douglas got a text from his friend Donna Manning saying: "Hurry up, lardarse." She was in a cafe waiting for him but it was in the CTV building, which was flattened by the jolt and Manning, a presenter for the channel, died there.

    After investing heavily in the three-game ice hockey tour, which began in Auckland last night and also includes games in Christchurch and Dunedin, the quakes hit and Douglas was left wondering if the game at the CBS Arena would come off at all.

    "If I wasn't a Cantabrian, I would have pulled out," he said.

    Douglas and business partner Gareth Webber had secured 22 Americans and Canadians but after the second quake three players pulled out, and the rest sent former NHL player Kerry Goulet to take a Gerry Brownlee-escorted tour of the city before agreeing to come.

    Persuading the players to visit a country where the sport is played by only a handful of people was easy, Douglas says, compared to organising an event that needs 30 kilometres of glycol-filled piping, chilled to minus 40 degrees, laid across a floor capable of having 200,000 litres of water pumped on top to create nine layers of ice, each 12 millimetres thick. Once you've done that, you only need lots of white paint and field markings.

    The whole thing is actually two new rinks brought in from Amsterdam and joined together. After the tour, Douglas wants to split them and install them in city centres so Rugby World Cup punters can go skating.

    "What I love is entertaining people. My goal isn't to have a game of hockey, but to have three hours of pure entertainment," he says.

    Douglas spent three years on the project, but says despite hockey's lack of profile here, he never considered it risky.

    "We knew this thing would fly. Ice hockey is gladiatorial. It fits our New Zealand psyche like nothing else."

    Meanwhile, after last night's opener in Auckland, this morning the floor was being melted, packed and transported to Christchurch.

    - Sunday News

  24. #74
    IHF Member BillyCanuck's Avatar
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    The rosters fall short of the hype this event was getting from the promoter. Nice to see some retired NHL'ers skating around, but the ticket prices don't meet the level of play IMO.

    But nzice, you said perfectly here:
    Quote Originally Posted by nzice View Post
    Those I spoke to, who went to the "event" enjoyed it - the hockey lacked the teamwork intensity and tension (perhaps like the allstars games...) - but it was an enjoyable evening nevertheless - and had >10x people watching a game than the largest rink in NZ - that alone changes the atmosphere.

    If you can go to local NHL games or World Champs or even to games in the top league in your country (and that includes NZIHL) you may see a better game. Perhaps it has similarities to the Harlem Globetrotters vs NBA..

    The crowd seemed to relish the Canadian vs USA rivalry - must have been a lot of expats in the crowd - most of the Canadians I knew went - and wore their nations colours proudly.

    But the haters are still going to hate...
    But is this quote really necessary??
    "If this was Iraq, this would never happen – but New Zealand is a really easy place to sell," he says.
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-news/n...t-to-scenic-NZ

    Also, the roster lied about at least one player: Blake Barkwell (the Canadian on Team USA) did not play WHL or major junior. He barely plays NCAA D3 for Adrian College.

  25. #75
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Quote:
    "If this was Iraq, this would never happen – but New Zealand is a really easy place to sell," he says.


    I think it is relevant to the article - NZ is an attractive destination - has won many #1tourism awards / or been voted #1 destination by various publications - and this makes it easier to attract visitors (incl hockey tourists) - we also have sthn hemisphere seasons, english speaking, stable govt, and a #1 rating - along with Norway :-( of lowest corruption

    I dont want to sound like a Toursim NZ promoter - in my business (not tourism or tourism related) I have very little trouble attracting v.senior visitors to our shores - and the business they help me with is an adjunct of their desire to come to NZ.

  26. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCanuck View Post
    Also, the roster lied about at least one player: Blake Barkwell (the Canadian on Team USA) did not play WHL or major junior. He barely plays NCAA D3 for Adrian College.
    That's a typo, it should read WSHL, the Western States Hockey League.

  27. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzice View Post
    Quote:
    "If this was Iraq, this would never happen – but New Zealand is a really easy place to sell," he says.


    I think it is relevant to the article - NZ is an attractive destination - has won many #1tourism awards / or been voted #1 destination by various publications - and this makes it easier to attract visitors (incl hockey tourists) - we also have sthn hemisphere seasons, english speaking, stable govt, and a #1 rating - along with Norway :-( of lowest corruption

    I dont want to sound like a Toursim NZ promoter - in my business (not tourism or tourism related) I have very little trouble attracting v.senior visitors to our shores - and the business they help me with is an adjunct of their desire to come to NZ.
    I just think Mr.Douglas chose his words very poorly. Anything compared to Iraq is an easy sell!

    I have yet to meet a person who has been to New Zealand who could say one bad thing about the country. My brother spent 3 months biking around the country and would move there in a heart beat. Heck, I would too!

  28. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCanuck View Post
    I just think Mr.Douglas chose his words very poorly. Anything compared to Iraq is an easy sell!
    Well. I guess if he would have said NZ is far better than France or whatever ppl from there would hate him now and there are more NZ visitors from any place in the world than from Iraq.

    Hope that NZ gets more teams for the NZIHL anyway.

  29. #79
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Some Video from the Auckland game last weekend
    http://youtu.be/BfqZkZmkIg4

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    Looking at the video, a) it doesn't appeared to have been exceptionally high intensity and b) it might have been me, but it didn't appear to be a very large bench for each team
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

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    i trained with them last night even though I'm opposed to the games (needed the ice time to prep for a league game). There are only 10 skaters and one goalie per side. The skill level is good although there is a big difference between the guys who have played NHL and those who played in lesser pro leagues.

    The intensity level is not exactly pro calibre. These guys are not going to hurt eachother regardless of what logo is on their jerseys. They train together, ride the same bus, stay at the same hotel etc etc. It's not a national rivalry. I think its a rip off for the money but I've seen good hockey in my lifetime. Some haven't. They have no price comparison. With that in mind, the marketers of the game still anger me something fierce for their blatant use of smoke and mirrors and mis-direction.

  32. #82
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    Icescapades down under

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/spo...des-down-under

    Icescapades down under MATT RICHENS Last updated 05:00 30/07/2011

    ICESCAPADES: Engelage, the goalie of the Canada team to play the USA in an ice hockey exhibition match in Christchurch on Saturday.
    It's the ultimate boys' trip.

    Members of the touring American and Canadian ice hockey sides are enjoying time away from home and the normal day-to-day "grind" of being a professional "haaarkey" player – plenty of drinks, tourist spots, mountain biking, shooting guns, playing golf and being celebrities in little old New Zealand.

    They get to hang out with their mates, ribbing each other and competing over everything and on the surface the worst thing they should have to deal with is the cold and the awful US dollar.

    It's not a bad way to spend your off-season.

    Amid all the fun are three exhibition hockey games, the second of which is tonight at CBS Canterbury Arena.

    But the players aren't all enjoying the experience.

    The younger ones are excited at being away from home, partying when possible with the odd hockey game thrown in and enjoying their "once in a lifetime experience".

    But some senior members of the tour group aren't as impressed.

    On the record they have nothing but nice things to say about New Zealand, its scenery and people, but behind the scenes they're far from happy. Auckland received a bagging. Several members of the group said that with Queenstown's party reputation, they would have preferred to be based there.

    "Six days in Auckland was a bit much," Canadian captain Derek Armstrong said.

    While Armstrong enjoys days out like yesterday's, when the two teams were guests at Terrace Downs and competed for national pride in golf, archery and clay-target shooting, New Zealand isn't what he thought it would to be.

    "I thought it was going to be like Australia," he said.

    "Sun, beaches, blonde-haired women and like island life. I know it's your winter, but, I guess it's just not what I expected."

    Some bemoaned the cold – odd for ice hockey players – while others said they expected Kiwis to be a happier people. Rugged up in borrowed Terrace Downs jackets still carrying the price tags, the hockey players' demeanour picked up when they began to compete.

    It doesn't matter if it's ice hockey, golf, claybird shooting or picking up New Zealand women, everything is a competition. For the record, the Canadians won the first game last week in Auckland, they won yesterday's golf and the shooting, but the Americans have the ladykilling title, or so they claim.

    The hockey games themselves are entertainment as much as sport and the players know it. They're here to put on a show and to attempt to promote their sport to a country that, generally, doesn't understand it.

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    Miller wasn't sure it would ever catch on here because of the lack of ice, but he wasn't worried. Even if the results are irrelevant in the great scheme of things, bragging rights on the bus and national pride – plus the odd side bet – mean the urge to win is strong.

    Accusations of contrived results are scoffed at by US captain Aaron Miller, who has 677 National Hockey League games under his belt. Canada won 4-3 on penalty shots in the game won in Auckland last week, and while Miller called it a "dream result" for spectators – and promoters – he said there was no way a bunch of American hockey players could let a Canadian team win.

    "We take it too seriously to fake a result like that," he said. "We're having fun out there, but we still want to win and take that seriously." Miller confirmed the fights were as much fun as anything, but denied they were staged too. He did however, admit the players weren't as rough as they would be in their home leagues when it came to checking each other into the glass or crashing into each other off the puck.

    With just 11 players in each squad, they're spending nearly twice as much time on court as they would in a National Hockey League game.

    "And these are exhibition games," he said.

    "A lot of these guys are in their pre-season ... this is their job, if they get hurt they can't work. We're still rough, but if a guy's not looking we're not going to smash them unsighted, we don't want to be messing with guys' livelihoods," he said. And it's quite a livelihood for some.

    Younger members of the touring party will take home about US$50,000-$60,000 (NZ$57,744-$69,191) a year.

    At the other end of the scale is Kyle Quincey, a defenceman with NHL team the Colorado Avalanche, who is believed to be on around NZ$4.3m a year.

    Their working holiday will end next week and at least one senior player will miss New Zealand. When most return to North America next week and are straight into their respective pre-seasons, two-time Stanley Cup winner Mark Hartigan doesn't even get to go to his Minneapolis home. He heads straight to Switzerland to join his Swiss Premier League team the Rapperswil-Jona Lakers.

    When asked what he thought of New Zealand, Hartigan pointed to the Southern Alps and the high-country Terrace Downs landscape and said: "What's not to love."

    - The Press

  33. #83
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    Relief as hockey gear found
    MATT RICHENS Last updated 05:00 30/07/2011

    Organisers of tonight's international ice hockey clash between the United States and Canada in Christchurch are breathing a sigh of relief for the second time this week.

    After a hair-pulling time when snow threatened to derail the event because organisers could not get all the equipment to the city, yesterday it appeared one player's gear had been pinched – meaning he would not be able to take the ice.

    After a training session on Thursday night, Cody Lampl, an American defenceman, could not find his gear-filled bag, including his skates.

    With no way of replacing the gear, organisers were preparing for the Americans to play one man light until the bag turned up late last night.

    "It's such a huge relief," promoter Craig Douglas.

    "It's worked out for us; everything has worked out for us and we're going to have a brilliant spectacle."

    Last Saturday's game one went to a penalty shootout with Canada winning, but the pre-game show, including a fireworks display, caused havoc, with debris having to be scraped from the ice.

    With a bigger pyrotechnic display planned for tonight's sold-out game at CBS Canterbury Arena, organisers needed to tweak preparations.

    More than 9000 tickets have been sold.

  34. #84
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    Promoter beats snow in bid to get ice ready GREG FORD Last updated 05:00 29/07/2011


    DON SCOTT/The Press STARS: Craig Fisken and his 5-year-old son Max collect an autograph from Canada's Aaron Mackenzie.
    His life has flashed before his eyes more times than he would care to remember this week but the promoter of the USA v Canada ice hockey exhibition match in Christchurch tomorrow night has assured ticketholders – all 9100 of them – the show will go on.

    Monday was a different story, however. The match came far too close for comfort to being canned after this week's snowstorm wreaked havoc with preparations.

    Cancelled flights from Auckland, where the first exhibition match was played before 10,000 fans at Vector Arena, forced an advanced party of ice technicians to make a dash to Christchurch by land. They could not hire a car for love nor money so Douglas bought one.

    "We drove through the night to Wellington and I then had to beg the [inter-island] ferry to let us on," he said.

    "We drove all night to Christchurch and then found out the containers, which were coming via rail, had not arrived. I had to then get on to the general manager of [KiwiRail] and ask him to divert a train to Rolleston where I hired a crane to offload the containers on to the side of the road.

    "Transit New Zealand then rang me to say I would get the biggest fine of my life for holding up traffic on a state highway. We eventually got all the containers loaded on to trucks and to CBS Arena on time for the ice to be made and the rink set up."

    The teams arrived by more conventional means yesterday afternoon and immediately took to the ice at the Alpine ice centre in Opawa for a practice session.

    In Auckland the action earned rave reviews. Fists flew in the opening minute, teeth were lost, a nose broken, blood on the ice, pretty standard stuff for an NHL ice hockey game.

    "We were hoping the sport would be well received by Kiwis," Douglas said. "But the response has been huge. The game [tomorrow] is a sellout."

    The professional skaters hit Terrace Downs for a round of golf today and go into battle tomorrow night in what will be one of the biggest sporting spectator events of the year in Canterbury.

  35. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzice View Post
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/spo...des-down-under
    On the record they have nothing but nice things to say about New Zealand, its scenery and people, but behind the scenes they're far from happy. Auckland received a bagging. Several members of the group said that with Queenstown's party reputation, they would have preferred to be based there.

    "Six days in Auckland was a bit much," Canadian captain Derek Armstrong said.

    While Armstrong enjoys days out like yesterday's, when the two teams were guests at Terrace Downs and competed for national pride in golf, archery and clay-target shooting, New Zealand isn't what he thought it would to be.

    "I thought it was going to be like Australia," he said.

    "Sun, beaches, blonde-haired women and like island life. I know it's your winter, but, I guess it's just not what I expected."

    Some bemoaned the cold – odd for ice hockey players – while others said they expected Kiwis to be a happier people. Rugged up in borrowed Terrace Downs jackets still carrying the price tags, the hockey players' demeanour picked up when they began to compete.
    Isn't there a PR guy to make sure players do not end up saying something that could upset the people they are trying to entertain?
    Quote Originally Posted by nzice View Post
    It doesn't matter if it's ice hockey, golf, claybird shooting or picking up New Zealand women, everything is a competition. For the record, the Canadians won the first game last week in Auckland, they won yesterday's golf and the shooting, but the Americans have the ladykilling title, or so they claim.
    Well, I guess that answers my question.

    Nothing like talking about how many girls they are sleeping with (and in a degrading way) in the media. Classy.

    I am sure parents are having their kids read this and having to answer "Mom, what does "ladykilling" mean?"

  36. #86
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    Ouch, this has been twisted into something completely different than promised
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

  37. #87
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    although many have enjoyed the "show", many others can't wait for the Gooch and these players to leave town so the promoters can make money off another sport and leave ours alone. So much for promoting the game in NZ as promised when they say it won't take off here. It's clearly a drinking trip and not a goodwill trip filled with hockey ambassadors.

    Fortunately, many will be more then happy to spend 6 days in auckland come world cup rugby time.

  38. #88
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    As I didnt attend - hard for me to comment - but all those I know who did attend enjoyed themselves. The reviews seem very positive. As a way of generating interest in Ice Hockey from outside the existing club/regional/national/school competitions - it seems to have considerable merit. If this were to be a regular tour I for one would be keen to see NZ Ice Hockey find a way to participate and generate interest for the local clubs and teams. One game to go in Dunedin.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/other-s...-Canada-hockey

    Fireworks, fisticuffs at USA v Canada hockey MATT MARKHAM 01/08/2011

    Other sports From prison to Jets, Burress finds new home Abigail Fox crowned BMX cruiser world champ US dominates swimming worlds with 16 golds Fireworks, fisticuffs at USA v Canada hockey Sun burst caps final session at world champs No rest for Lauren Boyle after finishing eighth NZ Olympic athletes given Twitter green-light Three medals for Kiwi BMX riders, but no gold Maori brothers eye Major League Baseball Rowing New Zealand should have sought help

    You wouldn't exactly call it vintage ice hockey – not when there was a wedding at halftime – but what was offered up at the CBS Canterbury Arena on Saturday night by Canada and the United States still had a full house hanging on the edge of their seats.

    It had everything you would expect: fighting, body checks and pucks flying both into the crowd and, more importantly, into the back of the net.

    It took almost a period and a half before the tensions rose high enough for the gloves to come off, but the final result, a 7-3 victory to Canada, was almost irrelevant.

    This was a party atmosphere and a chance for the people of Christchurch to smile and let their hair down for a few hours.

    Event promoters Douglas Webber Group produced a spectacle for more than 9000 screaming fans.

    There were some serious pyrotechnics, rival crowds on separate sides of the stadium, a guest appearance by NHL superstar Kyle Quincey and even a wedding.

    Staged or unstaged, when American Cody Lampl threw his gloves to the ice before the start of the third period and lined up a Canadian opponent, there was nothing fake about his ensuing punches, which gave him, and his punching bag, two minutes in the penalty box.

    Canada started the match with a hiss and roar as both sides struggled to find their form early on.

    The Canadians led 2-0 at the end of the first of three periods and looked to have the game won.

    Goals were scored by Julian Talbot and captain Derek Armstrong, who slammed the puck into the back of the net with only seconds remaining in the spell.

    The US fought their way back into the match in the second period, with three goals of their own, including a brilliant effort by Bates Battaglia, who had Canadian goal tender Andrew Engelage completely confused.

    Battaglia's goal was followed by goals from Ryan Turek and Geoff Paukovich.

    Players returned to the ice for the third quarter and Canada's Mark Hartigan opened the scoring to tie the match at 3-3.

    Hartigan found the back of the net twice more to claim his hat-trick as Canada cleared away for victory.

    The American side looked tired as the game wore on, and pulling their goalie for a minute didn't help their cause, with Hartigan helping himself to one of his three goals.

    The two teams will head to Dunedin for the third and final match on Wednesday.

    Canada have already won the Douglas Webber Cup, which was on offer for the tour, so the US will be looking to settle a few scores in the final encounter.

  39. #89
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    http://www.odt.co.nz/sport/ice-hocke...vitation-teams

    Plenty at stake for invitation teams By Jack Salter on Tue, 2 Aug 2011

    Ice Hockey

    The ice hockey series between invitational Canadian and United States teams will reach its conclusion tomorrow night, when the teams square off in the final of the three-match series at the Dunedin Ice Stadium.

    It is the first time an ice hockey series of this magnitude has been brought to New Zealand, and so far crowds of 14,000 and 9000 have attended the first two games, in Auckland and Christchurch.

    Promoter Craig Douglas said both sides were excited to be here, and were keen to show world-class ice hockey to a part of the world where they had never played before.

    Douglas said both teams had put on a good show in the two previous games and were getting better with each game.

    "Dunedin is really in for a treat," he said.

    Douglas added there would be plenty of physical stuff in the game.

    "It is not showmanship. It is real aggression.

    "If a player has a score to settle, they will do it on the ice."

    The players had an intense rivalry and they would not be holding back, he said.

    American player Bates Battaglia said the players would be giving it their all when they got on the ice in Dunedin.

    "It is the toughest game on earth," he said.

    The 35-year-old is in his 15th year of professional ice hockey.

    He is currently a free agent after playing in the National Hockey League for the Carolina Hurricanes, the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Colorado Avalanche.

    Canada has won both previous games, 5-4 in Auckland and 7-3 in Christchurch. This means the US will have to win by five goals to square the series.

    Both teams spent yesterday doing activities in Queenstown and will arrive in Dunedin today.

    Battaglia said it was an amazing place. He had completed a bungy jump and it was an "amazing adrenaline rush".

    The Dunedin match is sold out, with a crowd of 3500 attending.

    The puck drops at 6.45pm.

  40. #90
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    Yep that's good for hockey's image as a family friendly sport. Thank you Douglas Webber!


    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/5379...b-causes-upset

    Young cheerleaders' link to strip club causes upset

    A row has broken out after a group of young cheerleaders, including one aged nine, was used to promote Christchurch strip club Calendar Girls.

    The All Star Cheerleaders performed at an international ice hockey match on Saturday night at the CBS Canterbury Arena.

    Coach Claire Stackhouse said the group did not expect to be associated with Calendar Girls.

    She was not in town for the event but said she had been told the cheerleaders, mostly 15 and 16-year-old girls, were introduced as the Calendar Girls cheerleaders.

    She said some parents were concerned.

    "They're disappointed they announced them as that, as they spend a lot of time and money for their kids to train," she said.

    "They don't sign up for other people to pass them off as Calendar Girls, but then again their parents were all there and they didn't pull them from their performance."

    Strip club owner Jacqui Le Prou said she sponsored the event and asked Stackhouse to provide a squad of older girls.

    "They were announced as All Star Cheerleaders brought to you by Calendar Girls," she said.

    "The whole reason we didn't want young girls is because [the cheerleaders] were being brought to you by Calendar Girls and we didn't want there to be a problem."

    Le Prou said Stackhouse sent a group of young girls, including one nine-year-old.

    "I spoke to her father on the day and said I wasn't very happy with her doing the event, but it was too late and I ended up pulling my Calendar Girls cheer out of the event, and they just did the America and Canada cheers."

    She said she donated $500 to the All Star Cheerleaders in Christchurch in exchange for them doing the event.

    "I said, `I need these girls to be older'. I wasn't ever going to introduce them as Calendar Girls. They were always going to be the All Star Cheerleaders and she sent me a nine-year-old, which I wasn't very happy about."

    Le Prou said the cheerleaders at the Auckland event were between 18 and 24.

    "I'm not sure if Claire has let some of the parents know who was bringing them to the event and they've found out. I explained to her right in the beginning, `We are Calendar Girls. The parents need to know and if they're not comfortable with them doing cheerleading for us, they shouldn't be doing it'. She hasn't let anyone know."

  41. #91
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    Man, Douglas Webber has really twisted this event into a whole other level of misplaced optimism hasn't he?
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

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    on a more laughable note, reports are that the Canadian and US teams were not allowed to take slapshots in the Auckland game due to insufficient netting. I can't count how many times I heard about this pro rink being shipped to NZ at tremendous cost yet for want of a bit of netting, slap shots were barred. Imagine that at a world champs or Olympics. "Hey Crosby, we really like your backhand a lot so if you could use that more and refrain from using your slap shot, we would really appreciate it. Yours sincerely, Rene Fasel"

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    Ice hockey: Full house awaits at Dunedin Ice Stadium

    http://www.odt.co.nz/sport/ice-hocke...in-ice-stadium

    Ice hockey: Full house awaits at Dunedin Ice Stadium

    By Alistair McMurran on Wed, 3 Aug 2011

    Temporary seating is put in place at the Dunedin Ice Stadium yesterday for the invitation ice hockey international between the United States and Canada tonight. Photo by Craig Baxter.
    Derek Armstrong's leadership has been a key factor in Canada's impressive start in the Invitational ice hockey series against the United States.
    Armstrong (38) is one of the classy forwards in the Canadian team which leads the three-match series that concludes at the Dunedin Ice Stadium tonight.

    He played 600 games in the North American National Ice Hockey League for the Los Angeles Kings from 2001 to 2009.

    Canada leads the series with a 5-4 win at Auckland and a 7-3 margin at Christchurch. The series is decided by goals scored over the three games and the United States would need to win by five goals to take the honours.

    "Canada walked all over the United States in game two," promoter Craig Douglas said.

    "I have talked to members of the US team and they are unhappy about that result and want to settle score tonight.

    "The Canadian team has impressed in the first two games with their team work. They came here well prepared."

    The most experienced member of the United States team is Aaron Miller (39), who had a 14-year career in the National Ice Hockey League and won a silver medal in the Unite States team at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

    He is a talented defender who played 677 games in the National Ice Hockey League.

    The United States goaltender is John Grahame (35), who was a member of the Unites States team at the 2006 Olympic Games.

    Ice hockey is a rich sport and in 2006 Grahame signed a two-year contract with the Carolina Hurricanes for $US2.8 ($NZ3.1) million.

    Most of the players in tonight's game have past their best but they will still produce a higher standard of ice hockey than has been seen in New Zealand before.

    It will be a transformed Dunedin Ice Stadium tonight with a grandstand brought south from Christchurch to seat a 1000 people. The total capacity is 3508. It has been erected over the curling rink and will give spectators a close-up view of the game.

    The stadium will have all the atmosphere is typical of big ice hockey games played in North America. This includes a big-screen television. There will be 11 television cameras focused on the game.

    Douglas said it "will be screened live to the United States and will be available for international television".

    The series will be screened for New Zealand audiences on Sky Television on August 14.

    There have been sell-out crowds at Auckland (10,441), Christchurch (9100) and tonight at the Dunedin Ice Stadium (3500). Dunedin Ice Stadium manager Neal Gamble said it would be the first sell-out crowd at the stadium.

    "It will be a great introduction to ice hockey for those who have not experienced the sport live before," he said.

    "The series has been good for New Zealand ice hockey. I have encouraged the event from the start."

    The game starts at 6.45pm.

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    New Zealand Overcrowding complaint lodged - Dunedin

    Overcrowding complaint lodged By Debbie Porteous on Fri, 5 Aug 2011

    The crowd at the Canada v United States international ice hockey match at the Dunedin Ice Stadium on Wednesday night. Photo by Peter McIntosh.
    The success of the first sold-out game at the Dunedin Ice Stadium may yet be marred by a safety investigation after a complaint of overcrowding.
    The complaint was laid with the Dunedin City Council's building control team on Wednesday night after a Canada v United States invitational ice hockey game at the Victoria Rd stadium. It concerned apparent safety issues about seating at the game, and allegations people were forced to sit in the aisles, stairs and walkways after seating ran out.

    Dunedin woman Susan Dunn did not make the complaint, but raised similar issues with the Otago Daily Times yesterday. She said she was shocked by what she saw after arriving early to ensure a good vantage point.

    After the available seating filled up, extra pews were brought in and placed in the walkways between the ice rinks and in front of the front rows in the elevated stand at the south end of the stadium. People also filled stairs above the main rink.

    "They just kept pouring in and we were thinking, where are all these people going to go? You wanted to be angry with people, but they paid for a ticket and there was nowhere for them to go, so you couldn't really be."

    She complained to security that people on the stairs was a fire hazard, and they agreed it was a safety issue, but no action was taken to resolve the problem.

    "How can promoters get away with selling more tickets than seats?" Ms Dunn asked.

    Despite telling the ODT earlier this week that with imported seating from Christchurch, the stadium's capacity would be 3500, the event's promoter Craig Douglas yesterday said the capacity had only ever been 2890 and only 2890 tickets were sold for the game.

    "But I do reckon there were extra people in there; that people got in somehow without a ticket. That place is such a big box, you know."

    Because there was no numbering on the permanent seating at the stadium, the tickets had to be sold as general admission, and without allocated seats, people had crowded into stairwells, walkways and aisles to try and get a better view of the big screen, he said.

    A team of more than 20 security staff was telling people to move all night, but it had been difficult.

    An announcement to the crowd at the end of the game that police and fire service staff would manage the crowd's exit was done at the instruction of police and "the fire department", who wanted to ensure an orderly departure, Mr Douglas said.

    He also said staff from those agencies helped the crowd leave the stadium in a controlled fashion.

    However, police yesterday said they visited the stadium during the game, had no concerns and left; and the Fire Service said it had had nothing to do with the event at all.

    Senior Sergeant Mel Aitken said members of a proactive policing team visited the stadium after the rugby at Carisbrook, to check liquor licence compliance. While there, officers had few concerns; although they did ask security to move some some tables and seats from in front of exits and left after that was done.

    Fire Service East Otago area commander Brendan Nally said firefighters did not go to the ice stadium on Wednesday night. He referred the ODT to the council's building control team for comment on the issue of fire exits and egresses possibly being blocked.

    Chief building control officer Neil McLeod said the council received a complaint on Wednesday night, but he was out of town and did not arrive back in Dunedin until late yesterday.

    He had not seen the details of the complaint by last night, so had "no idea" whether it had any substance, but said his team would investigate.

    - debbie.porteous@odt.co.nz

  45. #95
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    The latest news is that due to the over crowding, the Dunedin Ice Stadium is now being limited to 1000 people for future events. He's just screwed over dunedin and NZ hockey despite his claims to the opposite. The NZ Winter games drew over 2000 plus people for the Australia-NZ match and now half those people will be turned away. Divisional under 20 world champs are there next too which will now be hamstrung.

    Promoter showed total disregard for peoples safety when he publicly scoffed at any fire hazards due to it being an ice rink and nothing could be flammable.

  46. #96
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Ice rink hot idea for city - Hamilton's Garden Place is set to enjoy a slice of Europ

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times...-idea-for-city

    Ice rink hot idea for city
    Hamilton's Garden Place is set to enjoy a slice of European-styled enchantment

    LOUISE RISK 14:24 26/08/2011

    Hamilton's Garden Place is set to enjoy a slice of European-styled enchantment when an ice rink with all the whimsical trimmings is set up there next month.

    Hamilton Mayor Julie Hardaker confirmed yesterday a contract had been signed to bring an ice rink to the city for 40 days from September 15 – the timing coinciding with the Rugby World Cup through to Labour Weekend.

    Event promoter Craig Douglas, of Douglas Webber Group, said the rink coming to Hamilton was part of a larger rink brought to New Zealand from Holland for a series of international ice hockey matches between the United States and Canada.

    Setting up the 525sqm rink would take three days and 75,000 litres of water, and create an experience unlike anything seen in Hamilton before.

    A la A large section of Garden Place would become a raised platform topped with the 10cm thick ice rink, with fairy lights strung nearby, music playing over the loudspeaker, and bands performing live at peak times.

    "It will be a really good family atmosphere, and we're also promoting the idea of skate-for-a-date," Mr Douglas said.

    The entry fee – $20 for adults and teenagers, $15 for children 12 and younger – gives skaters access to one of 4000 pairs of new skates, and as much skating as they like, up to 12 hours if they stay on the ice from the rink's 10am opening until its 10pm closing each day.

    Coaches will also be on the ice during the day to help newcomers.

    "Within five minutes of being with a coach my two-year-old twins were skating by themselves," Mr Douglas said. "It's a sport everyone can enjoy."

    Ms Hardaker said bringing the ice rink to the city for 40 days cost $90,000, which included the power to run it.

    The cost to each sponsor – HCC, Grassroots Trust, Waikato Security Services, Hamilton/Waikato Tourism, Waipa District Council and Waikato District Council – was "commercially sensitive and so remains confidential".

  47. #97
    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Hopefully this could translate into demand for a permanent rink in Hamilton. I stopped there overnight during my time in New Zealand, and took the time to walk around the city before heading off to catch the ferry, it's a beautiful city with great people. It would be great at some point to see another town take a liking to the ice.
    I'm still amazed that ice doesn't exist in Invercargill, the southernmost city in the country.

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