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Thread: IIHF Junior Eligibility for Dual-Citizens

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    IIHF Junior Eligibility for Dual-Citizens

    Does the two year rule apply to junior age players with dual-citizenship who've never represented either country at an IIHF event? What if the player has only played two consecutive years of hockey in one of the two countries?

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    In short, yes.

    Doesn't matter if a player has played two years in one, or both countries for which he or she holds citizenship. If you have multiple citizenship, you must fulfill the requirements no matter what age you are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    In short, yes.

    Doesn't matter if a player has played two years in one, or both countries for which he or she holds citizenship. If you have multiple citizenship, you must fulfill the requirements no matter what age you are.
    Are you 100% sure on that? Two examples I can think of that don't seem to follow are Adam Deadmarsh and Colin Wilson. Both are dual-citizens who, unless I'm mistaken, represented the US at IIHF events before having completed two full seasons playing in the US. Deadmarsh played at the '93 U20 tournament after a year and a half in Portland and Wilson played at the '06 U18 at the end of his first season in the US. How were they deemed eligible?

    Edit: Also, while less well known than the above, Jason Bailey played for the US at the '05 U18 tournament at the end of his first season in the US.

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    First, regarding Adam Deadmarsh... 1993 is 18 years ago. I don't have a copy of the IIHF Statutes & Bylaws from that far back, so I can't look up the eligibility regulation at that time.

    As for Colin Wilson, considering he was born in the United States and joined the USNTDP, I think it's quite safe to assume he played a fair chunk of his minor hockey in the United States.

    Unfortunately I can only seem to find the 2006-2010 and current versions of the IIHF Sports Regulations which determine eligibility. For 2005 I'm in the same situation as 1993, where I can't confirm that the regulations at that time were (or were not) the same as they are today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    As for Colin Wilson, considering he was born in the United States and joined the USNTDP, I think it's quite safe to assume he played a fair chunk of his minor hockey in the United States.
    I'm actually almost positive that he lived in Manitoba exclusively since he was 3 or 4 years old. Is there an age or level of play requirement specified by the IIHF? Could a 2/3 year old that's enrolled in the preliminary levels of hockey possibly meet those? It seems absurd but it could be a legitimate question in certain cases.

    The other question is how thorough is the IIHF in these matters? What kind of proof must players present?

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cagney View Post
    I'm actually almost positive that he lived in Manitoba exclusively since he was 3 or 4 years old. Is there an age or level of play requirement specified by the IIHF? Could a 2/3 year old that's enrolled in the preliminary levels of hockey possibly meet those? It seems absurd but it could be a legitimate question in certain cases.

    The other question is how thorough is the IIHF in these matters? What kind of proof must players present?
    Yes, as long as the player is registered with a group that is recognized by the national federation.
    Sebastien Bordelau (Canadian/French) played two years in France between age 10-12 when his father played there i think.

    The proof that must be shown to the IIHF is documents indicating that the player was in fact playing hockey in the country. Either registration documents from the organisation, gamesheets, ... anything to indicate.
    The IIHF then rules on the matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    Yes, as long as the player is registered with a group that is recognized by the national federation.
    Sebastien Bordelau (Canadian/French) played two years in France between age 10-12 when his father played there i think.

    The proof that must be shown to the IIHF is documents indicating that the player was in fact playing hockey in the country. Either registration documents from the organisation, gamesheets, ... anything to indicate.
    The IIHF then rules on the matter.
    Thanks a lot for the information.

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    IHF Member Hockey_Algeria's Avatar
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    Rod Stewards son is trying to play for GB now, dont think the IIHF will allow it...

    http://www.dailystar.co.uk/posts/view/196631?123

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hockey_Algeria View Post
    Rod Stewards son is trying to play for GB now, dont think the IIHF will allow it...

    http://www.dailystar.co.uk/posts/view/196631?123
    Yeah, I feel like this is a lost case for them, given that he simply hasn't played in GB at all. I could be wrong, but even if he didn't have a chance to live in the UK at all, the IIHF rules are there.
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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conesy View Post
    Yeah, I feel like this is a lost case for them, given that he simply hasn't played in GB at all. I could be wrong, but even if he didn't have a chance to live in the UK at all, the IIHF rules are there.
    If he gets to play for GB, then it just means that money talks at the IIHF HQ in Zurich.

    I take great exception to the following quote in the article:

    They will be asked to make a special exemption for the forward, 17, because of his family circumstances which meant he has been brought up in America.
    That's complete BS. "Family circumstances" would mean that he was brought up in the US but only held a British passport. In other words, Olaf Kolzig. As soon as they decided to give him two passports, this was no longer "family circumstances" and simply emigration.

    Graham.
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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Methinks this is an effort on their part to be able to get him to play internationally far easier, as there really isn't much chance for him to represent the US
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    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    He could try New Zealand.... Rachael's our girl... (I cant believe I just said that)

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    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    I see that Liam Stewarts attempt to play fro GB now have the support of Rachael.....


    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-news/n...on-star-on-ice


    Rach and Rod's son star on ice NEIL REID Last updated 05:00 17/07/2011

    Rachel Hunter has been in demand around the world as a supermodel and actress.

    Now the Kiwi sensation's 17-year-old son to rocker Rod Stewart, Liam, is being chased from the UK to the US for his ice-hockey skills.

    A star for glamour NHL franchise the Los Angeles Kings' junior squad in the 2010-11 season, Liam is being wooed by Great Britain for an international junior team.

    But despite being born in the London and possessing a British passport, he is not eligible to play for the age-grade side as he's never played ice hockey in the UK.

    Like his sister Renee, he has spent most of his years living in America with Rachel.

    But his famous mum is now leading a bid to gain a dispensation to the eligibility rules so her son can play for the UK.

    Andy French, general secretary of Ice Hockey UK, told Britain's Daily Star: "Rachel contacted us to say Liam would like to play for GB and since then I've been preparing a case for the International Ice Hockey Federation.

    "I'm optimistic we'll get the right answer and he can play for the GB Under-18s."

    Liam's case is now set down to be heard by the IIHF in September.

    If successful, he could be eligible to line up in the Great Britain senior team at next year's Ice Hockey World Championships.

    Liam is regarded as an exciting ice-hockey talent in North America, impressing NHL scouts with his goal-scoring ability.

    He topped the Los Angeles Junior Kings Under-16s ice hockey side's goal-scoring list last year.

    Rachel is no stranger to the sport of ice hockey, having been engaged to Los Angeles Kings star Jarret Stoll.

    Liam looks to have inherited his dad's athletic ability.

    Rod chased a professional sporting career before becoming a music sensation.

    He signed as an apprentice with the Brentford soccer club in 1961, about a decade before the release of his debut No 1 hit, Maggie May.

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzice View Post
    I see that Liam Stewarts attempt to play fro GB now have the support of Rachael.....


    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-news/n...on-star-on-ice


    Rach and Rod's son star on ice NEIL REID Last updated 05:00 17/07/2011

    Rachel Hunter has been in demand around the world as a supermodel and actress.

    Now the Kiwi sensation's 17-year-old son to rocker Rod Stewart, Liam, is being chased from the UK to the US for his ice-hockey skills.

    A star for glamour NHL franchise the Los Angeles Kings' junior squad in the 2010-11 season, Liam is being wooed by Great Britain for an international junior team.

    But despite being born in the London and possessing a British passport, he is not eligible to play for the age-grade side as he's never played ice hockey in the UK.

    Like his sister Renee, he has spent most of his years living in America with Rachel.

    But his famous mum is now leading a bid to gain a dispensation to the eligibility rules so her son can play for the UK.

    Andy French, general secretary of Ice Hockey UK, told Britain's Daily Star: "Rachel contacted us to say Liam would like to play for GB and since then I've been preparing a case for the International Ice Hockey Federation.

    "I'm optimistic we'll get the right answer and he can play for the GB Under-18s."

    Liam's case is now set down to be heard by the IIHF in September.

    If successful, he could be eligible to line up in the Great Britain senior team at next year's Ice Hockey World Championships.

    Liam is regarded as an exciting ice-hockey talent in North America, impressing NHL scouts with his goal-scoring ability.

    He topped the Los Angeles Junior Kings Under-16s ice hockey side's goal-scoring list last year.

    Rachel is no stranger to the sport of ice hockey, having been engaged to Los Angeles Kings star Jarret Stoll.

    Liam looks to have inherited his dad's athletic ability.

    Rod chased a professional sporting career before becoming a music sensation.

    He signed as an apprentice with the Brentford soccer club in 1961, about a decade before the release of his debut No 1 hit, Maggie May.
    Like I said before, this seems like a cheap way to get him to be able to play for a national team. If he doesn't even hold a British passport, then he shouldn't be able to play, period; he's not British either by birth, though by family, and with no passport, he's not considered British.
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

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    There's no way he would be able to play for Great Britain he is an American and should play for the Country of his birth which is the USA not Great Britain besides he hasn't even played a game over there.

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hockeyfan 88 View Post
    There's no way he would be able to play for Great Britain he is an American and should play for the Country of his birth which is the USA not Great Britain besides he hasn't even played a game over there.
    In this case I agree with you. However, there are several players playing for the national teams of countries that were not the country of their birth. Paul diPietro (Stanley Cup winner with the Habs in 93) for Switzerland and Darcy Werenka for Austria come to mind. Also Brett Hull, Adam Deadmarsh, Jason Pominville for the US and Tyler Myers for Canada; are you saying that they shouldn't be playing/have played for these countries?

    But at any rate, Liam Stewart shouldn't be doing this. Heck, if he's claiming he should play for Great Britain based on his dad, then I should do the same for China-Taipei, thanks to my mom.
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    I meant no disrespect towards players like the legendary Brett Hull who choose to play for another nation because of personal choice .

    But I will not tolerate a player who uses his father's celebrity status as an excuse to play for another nation where it is quite certain that he was not born there or even played hockey in that nation and has no legal right under the IIHF rules to play for that nation.

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Liam Stewart, according to the article, WAS born in London and DOES hold British citizenship.
    The question is whether he also holds US citizenship, and if so then he would not according to IIHF regulations be eligible to represent GBR in IIHF competition.
    Since they're making this a big public fight I can only conclude that Stewart IS a dual- or multiple-citizen, and thus would not normally be eligible unless he had played 2 years in-country.
    As far as DiPietro goes, he had played 7 full seasons in Switzerland (gaining citizenship along the way) before representing that nation, thus he fulfilled all IIHF requirements at the time to wear that jersey. He married a Swiss woman, is living there fulltime and and is from all reports a proud Swiss citizen.

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    IHF Member Stolpskott's Avatar
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    Henrik Samuelsson is a "four-year case" right?

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    IHF Member GX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stolpskott View Post
    Henrik Samuelsson is a "four-year case" right?
    yes

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    IHF Member Dompa's Avatar
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    Iceland

    well about that....


    what about Robin Hedström or his brother Dennis ?
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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dompa View Post
    well about that....


    what about Robin Hedström or his brother Dennis ?
    Regarding the Hedstrom's, you have to assume that since they hold Icelandic citizenship they were likely born there and began to learn the game there. The IIHF needs proof of a player having been registered in the country to be eligible, doesn't matter if it's when the player was 6-7 years old, or 22-23 years old.
    So if the Hedstrom brothers, or the Icelandic hockey association, were able to produce records of the two having been registered with a club in Iceland in their early years, it would be enough to grant them eligibility.
    Sebastien Bordeleau played hockey in France when he was 10-12 years old, while his father was playing there professionally. Because those records were found, he was deemed eligible to play for France internationally, which he did in the 2004 and 2008 World Championships

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    IHF Member Geoff's Avatar
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    According to Elite Prospects, Robin only holds Icelandic citizenship so it's not an issue for him.

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Update on Liam Stewart: it's been confirmed that he can play for Great Britain
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

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    IHF Member Hockey_Algeria's Avatar
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    Interesting decision. He was born in london but has never played in UK yet is allowed to play for GB. This could open up a big argument for small nations with juniors playing in Canada. I know algeria and morocco have a whole bunch of 15, 16 and 17 year olds who were born in algeria and morocco and have only ever played in canada.

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conesy View Post
    Update on Liam Stewart: it's been confirmed that he can play for Great Britain

    Complete farce. Just goes to show that money talks in Zurich...


    Graham.
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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    I'm personally not liking the move, as I think that it sets a bad precedent for the near future. However, I guess this means that I can play for China-Taipei without actually having been there (sarcasm alert).
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    IHF Member Bennison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    Complete farce. Just goes to show that money talks in Zurich...
    I wonder how they motivated that decision, unless he only has a UK passport...
    Cum bibam cervisiam gaudeo.

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bennison View Post
    I wonder how they motivated that decision, unless he only has a UK passport...
    If he only had a UK passport, it wouldn't be a discussion as he'd automatically qualify for the GB national team. But, it has been confirmed that he has a US passport.

    Graham.
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    A guy I play with was born in Hong Kong... I'll tell him to get in touch with the HKIHF, might see him in the next CCoA (he'd demolish all opposition and probably single-handedly lead them to the win)...

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    The only thing that I can think that has gone in Stewart's favour (other than mummy and daddy being famous) is that he is under 18. Most of the precedents have been for players in their 20s which have smacked of "tried to play for the better team but wasn't good enough, so this is my next best option." The IIHF may have decided that since Stewart has done this so young that he genuinely wants to play for Great Britain rather than sees it as a next best option.

    But, I'm still far from convinced.

    Graham
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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Yeah, I have to agree with Graham. I feel like it's a case of him not being remotely near being called by USA Hockey, so he's going with GB instead.
    Twitter: @CSmeeth

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    It seems to me that IIHF only let stewart play for Great Britian due to the star power of his father and Stewart realizing that he wasn't good enough to play for team USA

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Here's an article on Liam Stewart from the IIHF website: http://www.iihf.com/home-of-hockey/n...html?tx_ttnews[backPid]=955&cHash=3c82ce2995

    They said that the reason why they granted him the special exemption was because that it'd uproot his life just to fulfill the two year requirement
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    IHF Member Dompa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conesy View Post
    Here's an article on Liam Stewart from the IIHF website: http://www.iihf.com/home-of-hockey/n...html?tx_ttnews[backPid]=955&cHash=3c82ce2995

    They said that the reason why they granted him the special exemption was because that it'd uproot his life just to fulfill the two year requirement
    Although I´ve red the article and know the reason (as they´ve said it) I doubt that it is wise move from IIHF. There are many players in North America with different origins that can uproot their lives just to fulfill the two year requirement. I suppose that Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Ireland can find dozens of players like that.
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    IHF Staff Trim's Avatar
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    I agree with Graham and Dompa. It circumvents the current eligibility rules and sets a precident for a massive loophole.
    Bringing ice hockey to Northwest China!

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trim View Post
    It circumvents the current eligibility rules and sets a precident for a massive loophole.
    Yeah, I feel like it'd lead to the second coming of what happened with Armenia, but hopefully not to that extent. Bottom line is that this ruling opened a can of worms that will be iffy to deal with in the future.
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    IHF Member Hockey_Algeria's Avatar
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    we will definitely be using it for algeria in future, i can tell you that now.

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    The issue here, and the IIHF will point to this technicality, is that in Stewart's case while he is a dual-national, it is dual GBR-NZL nationality. However he has only ever played hockey in the United States and Canada. He is thus not, has never been, and could never reasonably be, eligible to play for ANY country and the exemption was given because of that.
    In the cases mentioned here, such as Armenia for example, the players were (it appears) dual Armenian-American citizens who simply hadn't spent the required time in Armenia. However the time they played in USA made them eligible to play for the States (if they were good enough), which is where that and other cases (such as Algeria or Ireland) differ from Stewart's rather unusual case.
    Algerian dual citizens, for example, who live in France, Sweden, etc, and hold the passport of that country in addition to Algeria's, have played long enough in France, Sweden, etc. to be eligible to play for at least one nation: they just aren't eligible to play for Algeria. Because of the fact that those players would hold eligibility to represent one nation, Algeria would have a much weaker case for an exemption to be made.

    It's a small detail, but an important one in this case I think.

  40. #40
    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    The issue here, and the IIHF will point to this technicality, is that in Stewart's case while he is a dual-national, it is dual GBR-NZL nationality. However he has only ever played hockey in the United States and Canada. He is thus not, has never been, and could never reasonably be, eligible to play for ANY country and the exemption was given because of that.
    I hadn't picked up on this in the latest release. An earlier story in the UK had stated that he did have US citizenship, but that now appears to have been wrong (or the Stewart's have pulled the wool over the IIHF's eyes!). I disagree that it is a minor detail. I think it is the key factor. As you say, he is in a unique position in that he does not meet the criteria to play for any country and I would hope that any other player in his position is given a similar level of exemption. But, I would hope that it is the only circumstance where an exemption is made.

    I think the IIHF need to modify their rules to cover this. "In situations where a player has multiple citizenships but has played in neither country, then they must make a declaration to the IIHF which country that they want to represent. They must hold citizenship for the country that they plan to represent."

    After all, if they don't make that clear, there could be an argument that it is the citizenship requirement that is dropped rather than the 2-year qualification requirement. In other words, without the rule above being in place, Stewart could have made an argument that he wanted to represent the USA.

    Graham.
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  41. #41
    IHF Member Bennison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    It's a small detail, but an important one in this case I think.
    I agree, this is a decisive difference to the other cases (Armenian-, Croatian- and Algerian-American) that has been discussed here.
    Cum bibam cervisiam gaudeo.

  42. #42
    IHF Member Hockey_Algeria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    The issue here, and the IIHF will point to this technicality, is that in Stewart's case while he is a dual-national, it is dual GBR-NZL nationality. However he has only ever played hockey in the United States and Canada. He is thus not, has never been, and could never reasonably be, eligible to play for ANY country and the exemption was given because of that.
    In the cases mentioned here, such as Armenia for example, the players were (it appears) dual Armenian-American citizens who simply hadn't spent the required time in Armenia. However the time they played in USA made them eligible to play for the States (if they were good enough), which is where that and other cases (such as Algeria or Ireland) differ from Stewart's rather unusual case.
    Algerian dual citizens, for example, who live in France, Sweden, etc, and hold the passport of that country in addition to Algeria's, have played long enough in France, Sweden, etc. to be eligible to play for at least one nation: they just aren't eligible to play for Algeria. Because of the fact that those players would hold eligibility to represent one nation, Algeria would have a much weaker case for an exemption to be made.

    It's a small detail, but an important one in this case I think.
    We also have players born in Algeria, hold only Algerian passport, but of course have never played inside Algeria. I expect them to be eligible after this case.

    Then we have players born in Algeria, hold an Algerian passport, but later acquired the passport of the country they now live, I guess this would be harder to push through, but we'll still try.

    Then we have players born elsewhere but hold Algerian passports due to their parents, they'd pretty much have to play 2 years in Algeria.

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    Can anyone clarify the situation with Ainars Podzins (both Latvian and Russian citizenships) being denied playing for Russia at the upcoming WJC in Calgary? The back-story is that he was born in Latvia, grew up and learned how to play hockey in Russia, before being drafted by Dinamo Riga and playing KHL hockey in Latvia starting from last season. He has previously played for various Russian junior national teams, including ones at IIHF events such as the 4 Nations Cup. However, this time around, while at Russia's training camp, he was ultimately denied representing Russia. When interviewed, the coach said it was a complex situation that had something to do with him being registered as a Latvian citizen with his current club, but didn't seem to really know what was going on.

    Can anyone explain this decision?

  44. #44
    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hockey_Algeria View Post
    We also have players born in Algeria, hold only Algerian passport, but of course have never played inside Algeria. I expect them to be eligible after this case.
    They were eligible before this case. If the only passport you hold is Algerian, then you don't need the 2-year qualification. That only applies to players with multiple citizenships. This case has not changed players in this scenario.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hockey_Algeria View Post
    Then we have players born in Algeria, hold an Algerian passport, but later acquired the passport of the country they now live, I guess this would be harder to push through, but we'll still try.
    On the assumption that the country in which they now live is also where they are playing hockey, then this case can not act as a precedent. Stewart has a passport for 2 countries, neither of which he has really lived in (except for maybe short periods in his very early years). He has only played hockey in a 3rd and 4th country (USA and CAnada) for which he does not hold a passport and therefore can't represent.

    For countries looking to use Stewart's case as a precedent, then it needs to be recognised that under IIHF rules he was not eligible to play for any country in the world. Any player you are trying to bring into your own programme must be in a similar position. If they meet all the criteria to play for another country (citizenship and qualification period) then they must play for that country, regardless of whether or not they are good enough to do so.

    Graham.
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  45. #45
    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slitty View Post
    Can anyone clarify the situation with Ainars Podzins (both Latvian and Russian citizenships) being denied playing for Russia at the upcoming WJC in Calgary? The back-story is that he was born in Latvia, grew up and learned how to play hockey in Russia, before being drafted by Dinamo Riga and playing KHL hockey in Latvia starting from last season. He has previously played for various Russian junior national teams, including ones at IIHF events such as the 4 Nations Cup. However, this time around, while at Russia's training camp, he was ultimately denied representing Russia. When interviewed, the coach said it was a complex situation that had something to do with him being registered as a Latvian citizen with his current club, but didn't seem to really know what was going on.

    Can anyone explain this decision?
    First, the 4 Nations Cup is not an IIHF event. Only the World Championships and Olympics are. Therefore, playing for Russia in those tournaments is irrelevant to the case.

    To qualify for Russia, he would need to play and be resident for 2 consecutive years in a Russian league. He must also have applied for an ITC at least 2 years before he is due to represent Russia. He must also apply to the IIHF at least 4 weeks before the tournament starts to make his point.

    If he's registered as a Latvian citizen, I suspect that he has never had an ITC to play for his Russian team and that that is the blocker.

    Graham.
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  46. #46
    IHF Member Oz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slitty View Post
    Can anyone clarify the situation with Ainars Podzins (both Latvian and Russian citizenships) being denied playing for Russia at the upcoming WJC in Calgary? The back-story is that he was born in Latvia, grew up and learned how to play hockey in Russia, before being drafted by Dinamo Riga and playing KHL hockey in Latvia starting from last season. He has previously played for various Russian junior national teams, including ones at IIHF events such as the 4 Nations Cup. However, this time around, while at Russia's training camp, he was ultimately denied representing Russia. When interviewed, the coach said it was a complex situation that had something to do with him being registered as a Latvian citizen with his current club, but didn't seem to really know what was going on.

    Can anyone explain this decision?
    Noone can tell exactly what's going on, but one thing is for sure - he can't be a dual citizen of Latvia and Russia, because Latvian laws forbid its citizens to have multiple passports. If he aquired our citizenship, he gave up his Russian. That should make him ineligible for Russia.

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    IHF Member itry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oz View Post
    Noone can tell exactly what's going on, but one thing is for sure - he can't be a dual citizen of Latvia and Russia, because Latvian laws forbid its citizens to have multiple passports. If he aquired our citizenship, he gave up his Russian. That should make him ineligible for Russia.
    No. As I have mentioned before it's not impossible to hold 2 passports even if you are Latvian citizen. While still being Latvian citizen you can obtain new citizenship without giving up your current. What Latvian law says is that Latvia regards such a person as Latvian and as far as the country is concerned he only has one citizenship but the reality might be different. Podziņš is not the only person to hold Latvian and Russian passports. As he himself stated that he always has had Latvian citizenship so I reckon he obtained Russian citizenship along the way without giving up the first. He has played for Russia in IIHF sanctioned tournaments therefore he should be eligible to play for Russia. But he has been registered as Latvian player in Dinamo.

    Graham, if anything, the situation is other way around. He was eligible to play for Russia but isn't anymore. Probably because of his ITC transfer to Latvia.

    The truth is that only IIHF can clear this situation up. Because Podziņš doesn't know what is wrong, RHF and LHF both have no idea about IIHF rules and journalists are too god damn stupid to check anything.
    Taro Tsujimoto, the greatest NHL player ever!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    Regarding the Hedstrom's, you have to assume that since they hold Icelandic citizenship they were likely born there and began to learn the game there. The IIHF needs proof of a player having been registered in the country to be eligible, doesn't matter if it's when the player was 6-7 years old, or 22-23 years old.
    So if the Hedstrom brothers, or the Icelandic hockey association, were able to produce records of the two having been registered with a club in Iceland in their early years, it would be enough to grant them eligibility.
    Sebastien Bordeleau played hockey in France when he was 10-12 years old, while his father was playing there professionally. Because those records were found, he was deemed eligible to play for France internationally, which he did in the 2004 and 2008 World Championships
    As it turned out today, this is NOT the case. Playing as a registered player under 10 does not count, the IIHF informed the Hungarian Federation today, so Hári Norbert won't play at home on the U18 Div IA IHWC.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerusz View Post
    As it turned out today, this is NOT the case. Playing as a registered player under 10 does not count, the IIHF informed the Hungarian Federation today, so Hári Norbert won't play at home on the U18 Div IA IHWC.
    Well, I guess that clears things up. Hrmm.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    Well, I guess that clears things up. Hrmm.
    Well, I guess it messes things further up. Because we cannot find this rule anywhere. Hrmm.

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