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Thread: Rachel and Rod's son an ice hockey international - for GB..

  1. #1
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Rachel and Rod's son an ice hockey international - for GB..

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/other-s...-international

    Interesting Development for GB Eligibility Rules...

    The teenage son of Kiwi model Rachel Hunter and rock star Rod Stewart is proving some guys have all the luck - he's set to play ice hockey for Great Britain.

    Liam Stewart, 17, has finally been declared eligible for selection for the Great Britain Under-18s team after months of negotiations between Ice Hockey UK and the International Ice Hockey Federation.

    The teen was born in London and has a British passport but was brought up in California and has been playing for a USA league.

    Liam is regarded as one of the sport's most promising young players, and scored up a storm - 24 goals in total - for his youth side the LA Kings last season.

    His likely inclusion in the squad will see Liam play at the World Championships in Holland next March.

    Liam was delighted he would now be able to play for the UK, the Scotsman newspaper reported.

    "I'm very proud to be cleared to play for the country I was born in. I know my dad would be especially proud so it was exciting to hear it was approved," he said.

    "It's an honour as I consider Great Britain to be one of my homes."

    Ice Hockey UK chairman Eamon Convery said: "Liam Stewart is a talented player and we are thrilled to have him available for GB selection.

    "Being Rod Stewart's son will no doubt mean huge interest in his career but I am sure Liam is keen to carve a path of his own."

    Liam's sporting prowess may come from his father.

    Stewart, 66, also showed promise as a sportsman in his youth, playing football to a near-professional level before settling on music as a career.

    However, Hunter's ex-boyfriend Jarret Stoll played for the LA Kings senior ice hockey team. The pair were together during Liam's early teenage years.

  2. #2
    IHF Member nzice's Avatar
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    Some guys have all the puck ....

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/Some-gu...the.6847262.jp

    Some guys have all the puck: Rod Stewart's son to play ice hockey for Great Britain

    Rod Stewart with his son Liam, pictured here in 1999, playing football. Photo: Getty

    Published Date: 04 October 2011
    By MARTYN McLAUGHLIN
    HE is skating, he is skating, home again, 'cross the sea.

    The teenage son of rock star Rod Stewart has been cleared to play ice hockey for Great Britain.
    Liam Stewart is regarded as one of the fast-moving sport's most promising prospects, and enjoyed rich goalscoring form for his youth side last season.

    The 17-year-old, whose mother is former supermodel Rachel Hunter, was brought up in California, but was born in London and has a British passport.

    Now, after months of negotiations between British team officials and the sport's governing body, he is set to embark on an Atlantic Crossing of his own to turn out for his homeland at under-18 level.

    Promoters of the game north of the Border said fans will cheer on the youngster as one of their own, given that Scotland does not have its own national ice hockey team, and forecast a surge in interest in the game as a result.

    Stewart, who plays as a centre, took up the sport five years ago and has impressed his coaches in the United States with his progress to date.

    He scored 24 goals for the under-16 team of the LA Kings last season, and currently plies his trade for the Spokane Chiefs, based in the state of Washington. The team plays in the Western Hockey League, one of the highest junior set-ups in North America, and hopes are high that Stewart - whose grandfather, Robert, came from Leith - can go on to grace the National Hockey League, regarded as the sport's grandest stage.

    Stewart expressed delight that he is now eligible for Great Britain and said that his father would be ecstatic.

    "I'm very proud to be cleared to play for the country I was born in," he said.

    "I know my dad would be especially proud, so it was exciting to hear it was approved. It's an honour as I consider Great Britain to be one of my homes."

    It is hoped that Stewart will make his competitive debut for Team GB next spring at the world championships in Holland.

    His inclusion in the squad would mark a successful conclusion to months of negotiations by Ice Hockey UK and the International Ice Hockey Federation.

    Mark Beggs, head coach of the British under-18s team, said: "It's great news we have been able to secure the approval from the IIHF that makes Liam eligible for Great Britain.

    "As head coach, you need to be aware of every single player who can play for the country and do in-depth scouting and request feedback to make sure they fit within the team."

    The youngster's rise to prominence in his chosen sport mirrors the promising football career his father enjoyed prior to finding worldwide fame as a singer.

    Liam's father signed for Brentford as an apprentice in 1961, a decade before his first number one hit with Maggie May.

    Though his time at the London club was short-lived - he lasted just three weeks - he remains an avid Celtic and Scotland supporter, and boasts his own full-size football pitch at his home in Essex.

    Eamon Convery, chairman of Ice Hockey UK, said that Stewart's profile would put a spotlight on the sport in Britain, but expressed confidence the teenager has the ability to succeed in his own right.

    He said: "Liam Stewart is a talented player, and we are thrilled to have him available for GB selection.

    "Being Rod Stewart's son will no doubt mean huge interest in his career, but I am sure Liam is keen to carve a path of his own."

    Jim Anderson, chairman of Scottish Ice Hockey, said: "Scotland does not have its own national team outwith the Great Britain team as the IIHF criteria states a team must be in a sovereign state, so Liam will be representing Scotland as well as Great Britain.

    "I'm really looking forward to seeing him play in the UK."

  3. #3
    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Another IIHF article about Liam Stewart. IIHF claim that the names of his parents were not revealed to the committee looking into his case.

    http://www.iihf.com/home-of-hockey/n...ash=3c82ce2995

    Graham.
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    "Under the circumstances, the Council (the IIHF’s executive body), which met during the IIHF Semi-Annual Congress in Istanbul, Turkey in September, made a special exemption so Stewart could play internationally. The feeling was that it would have been unwarranted at his age, to force him to move to another country and change his lifestyle and the level he was playing at, just to fulfill the two-year rule."

    oh poor him. son of a rich rich musician..

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    IHF Member Kiraly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzice View Post
    It is hoped that Stewart will make his competitive debut for Team GB next spring at the world championships in Holland.

    His inclusion in the squad would mark a successful conclusion to months of negotiations by Ice Hockey UK and the International Ice Hockey Federation.

    Mark Beggs, head coach of the British under-18s team, said: "It's great news we have been able to secure the approval from the IIHF that makes Liam eligible for Great Britain.
    There is a good chance Spokane will still be playing hockey at the end of March 2012. I wonder if they will release him for the W.C. Hopefully, they will as his participation would only bring added interest to the tournament.

    I don't really know anything about the 1994 age group for G.B., but I'm guessing Stewart would be a great addition....

    ...althougth it probably won't be enough for promotion.

  6. #6
    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiraly View Post
    I don't really know anything about the 1994 age group for G.B., but I'm guessing Stewart would be a great addition....
    If he is allowed to play, he's got a guaranteed place in the team. It would be a surprise if he wasn't our best player.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiraly View Post
    althougth it probably won't be enough for promotion.
    Disagree. We are the first seeds in the group. We would be expecting promotion from this group even without Stewart in the team.

    Graham.
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    IHF Member KevinMc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xunearthhxcx View Post
    "Under the circumstances, the Council (the IIHF’s executive body), which met during the IIHF Semi-Annual Congress in Istanbul, Turkey in September, made a special exemption so Stewart could play internationally. The feeling was that it would have been unwarranted at his age, to force him to move to another country and change his lifestyle and the level he was playing at, just to fulfill the two-year rule."

    oh poor him. son of a rich rich musician..
    This is a crock, how can the IIHF have one rule for one person and another rule for someone else......?

    The IIHF's impractical aproach to the two year rule has all but wiped out interest in team Ireland for the dual national citizens living in the North of Ireland. They expect players from the north to move to the south and play two years before they can represent their country. I've been enraged by this for a long time but they said it would open a can of worms for other countries with dual nationals near borders.......can opened!

    Double standards.

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    IHF Member Conesy's Avatar
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    Like I said in the other thread for the dual nationality, this will open up a can of worms that the IIHF will have to deal with. From the very get go, they should not have let him play with Team GB. He may have the skills to make it, but at the same time, if he hasn't spent the required years there, he should not be eligible, period.
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    IHF Member Kiraly's Avatar
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    Spokane advanced against Vancouver so Stewart will not be able to participate in the WC U18.

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiraly View Post
    Spokane advanced against Vancouver so Stewart will not be able to participate in the WC U18.
    We'd already given up on him anyway. His place was re-assigned before the tournament started to Pitchley.

    Graham.
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    IHF Member Hollywood's Avatar
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    Here was the problem:

    This unusual case presented interesting complexities. Although residing in the United States, Stewart holds dual British and New Zealand citizenship. He couldn’t play for the Americans since he is not a citizen. And according to international eligibility rules, he couldn’t represent Great Britain or New Zealand either, since he hadn’t played a minimum of two years in either country.

    So where would this leave him?

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    IHF Member KevinMc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    Here was the problem:

    This unusual case presented interesting complexities. Although residing in the United States, Stewart holds dual British and New Zealand citizenship. He couldn’t play for the Americans since he is not a citizen. And according to international eligibility rules, he couldn’t represent Great Britain or New Zealand either, since he hadn’t played a minimum of two years in either country.

    So where would this leave him?
    Well I'm sorry that's simple not an excuse, he should have been forced to move to GB and serve his time like everyone else.

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinMc View Post
    Well I'm sorry that's simple not an excuse, he should have been forced to move to GB and serve his time like everyone else.
    Actually, when you consider it I see it as being within the structure of the current IIHF regulations. The Statutes & Bylaws do make room for exceptions to be made in truly exceptional circumstances (and this is certainly one of those).
    Pretty much every single player in the world who is a dual-citizen is eligible for at least one of the two (or more) nations that he/she holds citizenship for (even if their chances of being chosen for that nation's NT is realistically nil, they would still be eligible, which is the key here). In this case, Stewart does not, and that's what makes this an exceptional case.

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    IHF Member KevinMc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steigs View Post
    Actually, when you consider it I see it as being within the structure of the current IIHF regulations. The Statutes & Bylaws do make room for exceptions to be made in truly exceptional circumstances (and this is certainly one of those).
    Pretty much every single player in the world who is a dual-citizen is eligible for at least one of the two (or more) nations that he/she holds citizenship for (even if their chances of being chosen for that nation's NT is realistically nil, they would still be eligible, which is the key here). In this case, Stewart does not, and that's what makes this an exceptional case.
    Yeah I totally get that, I just still feel hard done by and this is like salt in the wounds.

    The practical element in the Ireland case is worth consideration too. Expecting someone to move south of the border to play amateur hockey is asking too much when travel to the south for hockey is a more reasonable expectation.

    In the Ireland case i would like to see at least a compromise between what we are seeking , the full and immediate right to play for Team Ireland, and the IIHF's live and play for 2 years rule. If an Northern dual national chooses Ireland, he should be allowed to play for Ireland if he completes the 2 years in the Irish League (when it get back up and running) with a southern based team but the need to live south of the border would be waived as long as the playing part is achieved.

    However in the absence of the league in the south no matter what IIHF decide about the IIHA proposals the opportunity for dual nationals to gain Irish citizenship is not there, that makes Ireland and exceptional circumstance too. We have been without a league for 2 years, had it been running then maybe we would have more eligible players signed up. Just another thing to think about.

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    I think they got the Rod Stewart situation right.

    I don't think they have the Northern Ireland situation right, but I disagree with what you are asking for. A Northern Irish athlete is allowed to chose to compete for Ireland in the Olympics by birthright. In effect, Northern Ireland is regarded as being both a part of Ireland and Great Britain (interestingly, the IOC always refer to Great Britain, which Northern Ireland is not a part of, rather than United Kingdom, which Northern Ireland is a part of).

    I think that is what should be changed; the IIHF ruling on the Northern Irish should be made consistent with the IOC ruling. However, my understanding is that it is not the IIHF that is the barrier but the way that the IIHA constitution was written that makes it impossible for them to be All-Ireland within the IIHF framework.

    Graham.
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    IHF Member KevinMc's Avatar
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    Totally agree with your first point of view, anyone from the Ireland should have the birthright to play for Ireland and a proposal to that effect is going to the IIHF. But it's not as cut and dry as that. The problem arises when a player from the North has CHOSEN to be an Irish-British Dual national. If a person from the North never claimed their right to British Citizenship and only holds Irish Citizenship he can immediately play for team Ireland. The IIHF does currently respect the rights of people born in the North to choose to be British, Irish or Both. Therefore someone who has chosen to identify themselves as both is going to be subject to Dual National restrictions. After my initial hard feeling on this I can accept the IIHF point of view.

    My opinion on a compromise has only come about lately as a way of working out the impracticalities of expecting players to move south to play amateur sports.

    As far as IIHA constitution is concerned, that's a matter still being debated on the Ireland board. It originally did claim the north as part of Ireland etc but this was not allowed by IIHF rules as a governing body can only operate within it's own national borders, and represent a Sovereign State. Unfortunately the Sovereign state of the Irish Republic is only 26 counties and the north is part of UK and therefore already governed by IHUK. no territory can be governed by more than one association. The IIHA were told to correct this irregularity. It's argued the IIHA give up to easy without stressing the unique political and cultural situation here. After being enraged by the rules I have come to accept the IIHF point of view, Ireland's sovereignty is it's people and for many in the North Irish citizenship is cherished so as long as that was never under question we will continue to press for practical solutions for these issues.

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    Not quite as you say Graham. The British Olympic Association (BOA) is the National Olympic Committee (NOC) for Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The full title of our country is 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'. This is often abbreviated to Great Britain. There is no difference between the UK and Great Britain, both are abbreviated forms that include Northern Ireland.

    Now if Scotland leaves the United Kingdom after the forthcoming referendum we can have a whole new discussion about country names.

    I agree that the IIHF should allow people who play their hockey in Northern Ireland to represent Ireland.

    Cheers Geoff

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    I think they got the Rod Stewart situation right.

    I don't think they have the Northern Ireland situation right, but I disagree with what you are asking for. A Northern Irish athlete is allowed to chose to compete for Ireland in the Olympics by birthright. In effect, Northern Ireland is regarded as being both a part of Ireland and Great Britain (interestingly, the IOC always refer to Great Britain, which Northern Ireland is not a part of, rather than United Kingdom, which Northern Ireland is a part of).

    I think that is what should be changed; the IIHF ruling on the Northern Irish should be made consistent with the IOC ruling. However, my understanding is that it is not the IIHF that is the barrier but the way that the IIHA constitution was written that makes it impossible for them to be All-Ireland within the IIHF framework.

    Graham.

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    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffH View Post
    Not quite as you say Graham. The British Olympic Association (BOA) is the National Olympic Committee (NOC) for Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The full title of our country is 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'. This is often abbreviated to Great Britain. There is no difference between the UK and Great Britain, both are abbreviated forms that include Northern Ireland.
    In colloquial terms, England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom are often used synonymously. However it is not true that there is no difference, certainly in legal or political terms.

    Great Britain is England, Scotland and Wales.

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. These are also known as the constituent countries of the United Kingdom.

    The British Islands are England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

    It is also not true to say that the BOA is the NOC for Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In addition to the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom under that grouping, it also represents:

    Crown Dependencies
    - Guernsey
    - Isle of Man
    - Jersey

    British Overseas Territories
    - Anguilla
    - British Antarctic Territory
    - British Indian Ocean Territory
    - Falkland Islands
    - Gibraltar
    - Montserrat
    - Pitcairn Islands
    - Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
    - South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
    - Turks and Caicos Islands

    Sovereign Base Areas
    - Akrotiri and Dhekelia

    Three British Overseas Territories are represented by their own NOCs (Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands).

    Graham.
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  19. #19
    IHF Member ElQuapo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    The British Islands are England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
    And the Republic of Ireland - although politically not connected to the others.

    At least that is what I have always learned in English class :-)

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    No Graham.
    The British Islands ( more often The British Isles ) and Great Britain are both redundant terms for which there is no current political or economic entity. They are purely colloquial terms. The Kingdom of Great Britain ceased to exist in 1801 !!
    My description of the BOA was taken from their website and was used to illustrate that it does cover Northern Ireland.
    Strictly speaking the BOA is the NOC for the UK.
    There are historical anomalies as regards IOC membership but the policy is now to align with the UN.

    Geoff

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    In colloquial terms, England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom are often used synonymously. However it is not true that there is no difference, certainly in legal or political terms.

    Great Britain is England, Scotland and Wales.

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. These are also known as the constituent countries of the United Kingdom.

    The British Islands are England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

    It is also not true to say that the BOA is the NOC for Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In addition to the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom under that grouping, it also represents:

    Crown Dependencies
    - Guernsey
    - Isle of Man
    - Jersey

    British Overseas Territories
    - Anguilla
    - British Antarctic Territory
    - British Indian Ocean Territory
    - Falkland Islands
    - Gibraltar
    - Montserrat
    - Pitcairn Islands
    - Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
    - South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
    - Turks and Caicos Islands

    Sovereign Base Areas
    - Akrotiri and Dhekelia

    Three British Overseas Territories are represented by their own NOCs (Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands).

    Graham.

  21. #21
    IHF Staff Graham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffH
    No Graham.
    The British Islands ( more often The British Isles ) and Great Britain are both redundant terms for which there is no current political or economic entity. They are purely colloquial terms. The Kingdom of Great Britain ceased to exist in 1801 !!
    Definitely not true in the case of the British Islands. It's been a legal term since 1889 and is used when Westminster needs to pass laws that extend beyond the United Kingdom to the three crown dependencies. It does not include the Republic of Ireland. The British Isles is a purely geographic term and does include the Republic of Ireland.

    I guess it is not quite accurate to say that Great Britain is a legal or political term. Strictly speaking, it is only a geographic term which is used to describe Scotland, England and Wales. However, Westminster do use the term themselves when they need to describe something that does not include Northern Ireland. For example, whenever they produce statistics for which they don't want to include Northern Ireland, they will be described as being for Great Britain. Therefore, I'd argue that they are quasi-legal and quasi-political.

    It is certainly not true to say that Great Britain and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland are the same thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffH
    My description of the BOA was taken from their website and was used to illustrate that it does cover Northern Ireland.
    Strictly speaking the BOA is the NOC for the UK.
    There are historical anomalies as regards IOC membership but the policy is now to align with the UN.
    My point is that the BOA represent more than the UK. All of the "territories" I listed in my last post are not in the UK, but are represented by the BOA.

    Graham.

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    And my point is that in a sporting context there is no difference between the terms UK and GB. They both include Northern Ireland.
    Geoff
    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    Definitely not true in the case of the British Islands. It's been a legal term since 1889 and is used when Westminster needs to pass laws that extend beyond the United Kingdom to the three crown dependencies. It does not include the Republic of Ireland. The British Isles is a purely geographic term and does include the Republic of Ireland.

    I guess it is not quite accurate to say that Great Britain is a legal or political term. Strictly speaking, it is only a geographic term which is used to describe Scotland, England and Wales. However, Westminster do use the term themselves when they need to describe something that does not include Northern Ireland. For example, whenever they produce statistics for which they don't want to include Northern Ireland, they will be described as being for Great Britain. Therefore, I'd argue that they are quasi-legal and quasi-political.

    It is certainly not true to say that Great Britain and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland are the same thing.



    My point is that the BOA represent more than the UK. All of the "territories" I listed in my last post are not in the UK, but are represented by the BOA.

    Graham.

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    Corey Locke the former AHL topscorer and now playing for TPS Turku in the Finnish league has obviously dual citizenship i.e canadian/british. Perhaps he would be a great addition to Team GB in next WC Div 1 2013....

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    IHF Member Geoff's Avatar
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    Unless he played two consecutive years of youth hockey in the UK, I'm pretty sure he won't be eligible.

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    IHF Staff Steigs's Avatar
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    Interesting that Locke has dual-citizenship. When did he acquire British citizenship, and when did he ever live there/play hockey there?

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