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Thread: Biggest gulf in class between 1st and 2nd tier leagues?

  1. #1
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    Biggest gulf in class between 1st and 2nd tier leagues?

    What would you say is the hardest jump to make?

    The only reason I posted this in Norway is because I've been looking at the Get-Ligaen relegation results and was surprised how Kongsvinger finished the season way off the pace at the bottom yet are now beating up on the Division 1 teams in the playoff group.

    Obviously, this question is for leagues with standard promotion/relegation, so NHL v. AHL comparisons don't count.

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    Moved this thread to here...better place as it is a general topic.

    As for the quetion itself, I think Austria (and Slovenia) is a good candidate as well. There is no promotion/relegation between EBEL and INL and the reason for that is quite simple: a huge gap in level. Even the weakest EBEL teams (Ljubljana, Graz, Innsbruck) would pretty much thrash the top INL teams...

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    Denmark is an honorable mention to say the least.

    We also have no promotion/relegation system, but we do have a “league cup” tournament (equivalent to what you see in soccer e.g. FA cup, Capital One Cup etc.) and usually division 1 teams participate in the opening round.

    This year’s results:

    Herlev – Hvidovre 6-1
    Rungsted – Amager 6-0

    Both Amager and Hvidovre finished in the top-3 at the division 1-level.

    Whereas Herlev was nowhere close making the playoffs in the top league (and had the league's worst goal difference with – 121), Rungsted was swept 4-0 in the quarterfinals.

  4. #4
    IHF Prospect brhlcommish's Avatar
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    Interesting perspective. What are the longterm outlooks for some of these programs? In general is there an increase in participation at the youth levels that would ideally, in time, increase the competition levels of all leagues?
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by brhlcommish View Post
    Interesting perspective. What are the longterm outlooks for some of these programs? In general is there an increase in participation at the youth levels that would ideally, in time, increase the competition levels of all leagues?
    In the case of Denmark, things probably won’t change that much, due to the simple fact that a lot clubs seem to be at max capacity in terms of how many players there’s room for at the youth level, and with few new rinks on the horizon, what Danish hockey basically has to work with is roughly 2.000 players (based on IIHF’s player survey) under the age of 20.

    What you obviously have to do then, is maximizing what’s available and for the most part, the Danish Hockey Association has tried to standardize youth training, so that clubs have reference points for the different age groups.

    How much the average player can improve is of course a more open question.

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