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Thread: Finnish Hockey - 80 Years

  1. #1
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Finland Finnish Hockey - 80 Years

    Coinciding with the 100 year anniversary of IIHF, there are other interesting anniversaries to celebrate in 2008.

    The first one is the 80th anniversary of Finnish hockey.

    I do not pretend to be an expert on Finnish hockey, and I hope that our Finnish members, Jukka, Shardik & Co. will step in with more stories, facts and corrections, but for starters, here''s a brief history:

    With its thousands of lakes and icy Winters, there is arguably no place on earth where the natural conditions for skating are as as good as in Finland. Indeed, a few weeks ago, archeologists revealed that people have been skating here for more than 5,000 years.

    Although the first Finnish recordings of something that resemble hockey dates back to 1899, it took some time for ice hockey to get a foothold in Finland. Like in other parts of Nothern Europe, bandy ('hockey with a ball' as it is called in Russia) was initially much more popular in Finland, and the Finnish Skating Associations hesitated for decades to allow ice hockey under its ranks. It was only in the mid-20's its resistance seemed to fade. On Boxing Day, 26 December 1926, Yrjö Salminen, the Chairman of the Finnish Skating Association appeared on the ice on a lake near Tampere with a set of hockey sticks and some pucks and announced his famous words: "Get on and play, Boys!". The following year hockey was included as an independent sport under the Finnish Skating Association.

    On 15 January 2008, it as 80 years ago the first official club match in Finland was played between two Tampere teams, Pyrintö and Pallolijat. This event marked the official start of Finnish hockey. Two weeks later, on 29 January 1928, Finland played its first national game - in Helsinki vs Sweden. (Finland lost 1:8). The first Finnish championship, organised as a cup tournament, took place the same Winter, with Reipas Viborg as the winner. Later that year, Finland became a member of the IIHF.

    On 20 January 1929, the Finnish Ice Hockey Association was founded. HJK Helsinki won the first championship under the helm of this new association.

    Finland won it first international game (2-1 vs Latvia) as late as 1937. It would almost take another 30 years for Finland to beat its archrival, Sweden (15/1 1963 to be precise; Finland won its first official victory over Sweden as late as 1970). In 1939, Finland participated in the World Championship for the first time. The team lost all its games and finished 13th and last. During the World Championship in Stockholm in 1949, Finland recorded its first victories in the IHWC (7:3 vs Norway and 17:2 vs Belgium). Meanwhile, in 1948, the Finnish lion as adopted as the national team's emblem (60 year anniversary in 2008).

    It was only in the mid-1950s that hockey really started to take off in Finland as the popularity of bandy faded and and the first artificial rinks, starting with one at Tampere in 1956, were constructed. From then on, Finnish hockey started to record rapid progress, both in terms of number of players and in attendance to the Finnish hockey league.

    In the 1960s, the Finnish national team finally started to produce noteworthy results. As mentioned, Finland recorded its first victory over Sweden in 1963 (first official victory in 1970), Czechslovakia was beaten for the first time at the IHWC in Vienna in 1967 (3:1) and Canada at the Olympic Games at Grenoble in 1968 (5:2).

    Still, during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and unlike today, Finland remained outside the true world elite. Unlike Canada, Czechoslovakia, Sweden and USA, Finland never recorded an official victory over the Soviet Union, and the Finnish national team only beat USSR twice in 95 inofficial games (the first victory was recorded in 1976, the second as late as 1990). Until 1991, the 3:1 victory in 1967 remained Finland's only official victory over Czechoslovakia, and until the 1980s, Finland rarely managed to take points from the Czechoslovakians in inofficial games. The only thing that seemed to matter was to beat the Swedes. Once this was accomplished, Finland would still usually find themselves in the relegation round.

    Nevertheless, Finnish hockey continued to progress during the 1970s and 80s, partly helped by growing professionalism in the Finnish hockey league (the SM-Liiga was established as a professional league in 1975) and an excellent junior program. 2 January 1978 - 30 years ago - was a historical day in Finland. At this day, the Finnish U18 team took home not only the first hockey gold, the European Championship, for Finland, but also Finland's first gold in any team sport! In the final, Finland beat the Soviet Union 6-5 after a thriller of a game that went on OT and even sudden-death! The decisive goal was scored by a player who turned out to be one of Finland's best ever: Jari Kurri (picture of the historic goal will be uploaded).
    In the European Championship, the Finnish U18 team would win the gold again in 1986, while it took silver in 1979, 1983 and 1988. The U20 team won the world championship in 1987 after Canada and the Soviet Union were disqualified after the infamous bench brawl. Meanwhile the U20 team won silver in 1980, 1981 and 1984 and bronze in 1982 and 1989.

    Thus, from the late 1970s and onwards, Finland continued to produce some of the best national junior teams in the world, but the senior team continued to struggle. A major reason for this was the the Finnish national team, partly due to the relatively lesser depth in Finnish hockey and partly to the absence of migration restrictions, seemed to suffer more than Sweden (and USSR and Czechoslovakia) from the exodus of the country's best players to the professional leagues across the Atlantic (NHL and WHA).

    Had the WHA not been established in the 1970s (and the NHL expanded), it is likely that Finland would have broken into the elite nations in the late 70s or early 80s. However, Finland would have to wait until the fall of the Berlin wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union which caused another exodus of European players, this time from Russia and Czechoslovakia.

    In 1992, Finland finally won its first world championship medal (silver). Meanwhile, Finland had won silver at the Olympic Games in Calgary. In 1994, Finland nearly took the final step up when they were defeated in the final by Canada in a thriller of a shootout. In the shootout Finland was down 0:2 (goals by Robitaille and Sakic), but Kurri and Mäkelä tied it up. When Verbeek missed his shot, Finland could weather the gold. However, Canada quickly regained the lead by another goal by Robitaille, and when Nieminen failed (again), it was all over. Finland would have to settle with another silver medal.

    The disappointment proved shortlived. In 1995, In 1995, Finland exploded in joy when the national team won its first (and so far only) gold medal, and to make the victory even more sweet, even beating Sweden in the final (4:1) and on Swedish soil! This gold medal is still regarded as the greatest accomplishment in Finnish sport, a clear evidence how big hockey has become in Finland.

    Though Finnish national team still have to prove it can win the decisive games (the team has too many silver medals around its neck), Finnish hockey has remained a power house since the early 1990s. Also on club level: Jokerit has won the European cup twice (1995 and 1996) and TPS Turku once (1994) and the Finnish champions (Kärpät and HPK) have been runners up in all the European Champion Cups that have been played so far. Also the junior teams have continued to produce great results since the early 90s. The U18 team won the first U18 world championship in 1997 and largely the same team won the U20 world championship in 1998. Overall, the Finnish junior teams have only been behind Canada and Russia since the 1990s.

    Even though "the next elite nation" has been a popular topic on this board,Finland is the only country (besides the Soviet Union) that has managed to break into these ranks in the 100 years of international hockey, and as indicated it took Finland more than 60 years to do this.

    With these concluding words, I hereby open the thread in the hope that our members will contribute with more stories and facts about the history of Finnish hockey.

    Attached: the Finnish team at the World Championship in Basel 1939 (source: The Finnish Hockey Hall of Fame)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Karsten; 28-12-2007 at 03:00.

  2. #2
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    THE FINNISH HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIPS

    The Finnish Championships is divided into the SM-Saarja period (1928-75) and the SM-Liiga period (1975-)

    As noted in the first post, the first SM-Saarja (abbreviation for Suomen mestaruussarja) took place in 1928 with Reipas Viborg (or Viipurin) as the winner. From 1934, the cup tournament was replaced by a regular league tournament. The championship was cancelled in 1930 (bad winter) and in 1940, 1942 and 1944 (because of Finland's involvement in the Winter War and the WWII).
    For many years, the SM-Saarja remained an amateur league, but as hockey became ever in the late 1950s and the 60s, professionalism started to creep in. In the 1960s, two leading Finnish household machine factories, UPO and Rosenlew established their own hockey teams, Upon Pallo and Rosenlewin Urheilijat-38. These teams were run by the money of the owning companies and the players were bought from the neighbouring teams. This would be the first steps towards professionalism. Further steps towards a professional league was taken in the early 1970s, when sponsor firms appeared on the players' uniform and more commercial funding poured into the top clubs. The desicive step towards professionalism was taken in 1975, when the SM-Liiga was established.

    LEADING CLUBS

    During most of the SM-Saarja era, Tampere (Tammerfors) remained the hotspot of Finnish hockey. After the WWII and until the mid-60s, the Finnish championship was primarily a contest between two Tampere-based teams, Ilves and Tappara. In most of the reminder seasons, the championship was won by Helsinki-based teams.

    SM-Saarja
    Ilves Tampere (15) - 1936, 1937, 1938, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1966, 1972
    TPK/Tappara Tampere: (7), 1953, 1954, 1955, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1975

    Helsinki-based teams won the championship in 1929, 1932, 1935 (HJK), 1933, 1934 (HSK), 1939, 1941, 1943 (KIF), Karhut (1965), HIFK (1969, 1970, 1974) and Jokerit (1973)

    The companies UPO and Rosenlew were based in Lathi and Pori. So were the teams they established (RU-38 won the championship in 1967). Apparently the purpose was to break the dominance of the Tampere and Helsinki-based teams (Shardik & Co. ???)

    SM-Liiga

    Throughout the 1980s, Tappara would re-establish its position as the dominant Finnish club team. In the 1990s, its position would be overtaken by Jokerit, Helsinki and TPS Turku. In the 2000, Oulu (Kärpät) in the far north has become the new hotspot of Finnish hockey. Ilves Tampere has only won the Finnish championship once in the SM-Liiga era (1985).

    Tappara Tampere (8). 1977, 1979, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 2003
    TPS Turku (7). 1976, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1999, 2000, 2001
    Jokerit, Helsinki (5). 1992, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2002
    Kärpät, Oulu (4). 1981, 2004, 2005, 2007.

    Souces:

    Finnish Hockey Hall of Fame - Finnish hockey championships
    Wiki - SM-Saarja
    Wiki - SM-Liiga

    The Wikis include links to historical notes on the various clubs.

  3. #3
    IHF Member SharksAttack's Avatar
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    There's map of SM-Sarja/SM-Liiga teams and years they played.
    *=plays in SM-Liiga 2014-15


    Espoo:
    *Kiekko-Espoo/Blues (1992-15)

    Forssa:
    FoPS (Forssan Palloseura, nowadays FPS) (1975-77)

    Helsinki:
    Arsenal (1948-49)
    *HIFK (Idrottsföreningen Kamraterna i Helsingfors) (1927-28, 49-56, 57-63, 64-66, 67-15)
    HJK (Helsingin Jalkapallo Klubi) (1927-47, 48-55, 56-66, 70-74)
    HPS (Helsingin Palloseura) (1927-29, 31-34)
    HSK (Helsingfors Skrikskoklubb) (1931-36, 38-49)
    Jokerit (1969-87, 89-14)
    Karhu-Kissat (1942-45, 46-47, 48-49, 50-57, 71-72, 73-74)
    KIF (Kronohagens Idrottsföreningen) (1927-28, 35-47, 49-53)
    Töölön Vesa (1955-58, 60-61, 62-64)

    Hämeenlinna:
    *HPK (Hämeenlinnan Pallokerho) (1949-50, 51-60, 83-84, 88-15)
    Tarmo (1938-59)

    Joensuu:
    JoKP (Joensuun Kiekko-Pojat, nowadays Jokipojat) (1971-72, 89-90, 91-92)

    Jyväskylä:
    *JyP HT/JYP (Jyväskylän Pallo Hockey Team) (1985-15)

    Karhula (nowadays part of Kotka):
    KyPa (Kymin Pallo) (1954-56)

    Kokkola:
    Hermes (1959-60, 66-67)
    Jymy (1956-58)

    Kouvola:
    KooKoo (Kouvolan Kiekko) (1987-90)

    Kuopio:
    *KalPa (Kalevan Pallo) (1957-59, 61-62, 86-99, 05-15)
    KuPS (Kuopion Palloseura) (1953-54)

    Lahti:
    *Reipas/Kiekko-Reipas/Hockey-Reipas/Pelicans (1965-70, 76-85, 90-94, 99-15)
    Upon Pallo (1967-69)

    Lappeenranta:
    *SaiPa (Saimaan Pallo) (1959-69, 72-73, 74-75, 80-86, 88-91, 96-15)

    Oulu:
    *Kärpät (1960-61, 65-66, 67-68, 77-89, 00-15)

    Pori:
    *Karhut/Ässät (1961-89, 90-15)
    RU-38 (Rosenlewin Urheilijat) (1964-67)

    Rauma:
    *Lukko (1950-53, 54-55, 58-67, 68-72, 73-83, 84-15)

    Savonlinna:
    SaPKo (Savonlinnan Pallokerho) (1966-67, 68-71)

    Tampere:
    Hilpara (1969-70)
    *Ilves (1931-54, 55-15)
    Pyrintö (1928-31)
    TaPa (Tampereen Palloilijat) (1927-32, 45-46)
    *TBK/Tappara (Tammerfors Boll Klubb) (1942-65, 66-15)
    TP-V (Tampereen Pallo-Veikot) (1950-51, 52-53, 62-63)
    TK-V/KooVee (Tampereen Kilpa-Veljet) (1950-51, 53-57, 58-80)
    VehU (Vehmaisten Urheilijat) (1968-69)

    Turku:
    Kiekko-67 (1970-71)
    Pyrkivä (1951-53)
    Riento (1930-31, 37-41)
    TPK (Turun Pallokerho) (1946-50)
    *TPS (Turun Palloseura) (1940-48, 52-62, 63-68, 69-15)
    TuTo (Turun Toverit) (1965-75, 94-96)
    ÅIFK (Idrottsföreningen Kamraterna i Åbo) (1928-31, 36-41, 44-46, 47-48)

    Vaasa:
    *Sport (1975-76, 14-15)

    Varkaus:
    WU (Warkauden Urheilijat) (1963-64)

    Viipuri:
    Reipas (1927-28, 31-32)
    ViPS (Viipurin Palloseura) (1928-29)
    Last edited by SharksAttack; 01-11-2014 at 06:40.

  4. #4
    IHF Member Shardik's Avatar
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    Great posts, Karsten! Very interesting reading. Although Finland's first victory wasn't against Latvia but Estonia.

    On that first ice practise. When Salminen brought those sticks to the ice none of the players knew how to use them. So in the very first practise session about half of the sticks were broken as the players swung them like bandy sticks.

    About Upon Pallo and Rosenlewin Urheilijat. These teams were originally founded to encourage the employees of the companies to exercise and didn't originally include hockey. Traditionally most Finnish sport clubs have many different teams. So Upon Pallo had activity especially in football while RU had football, athletics and wrestling teams. UP especially tried to get all possible top players to their team and many Tampere players went there. RU on the other hand tried to get younger, not established players to develop in their team.

    If you want to see some old pics from Finnish (actually Tampere) hockey, check here:
    http://www.info.tampere.fi/~ypyvapri/Kiekko/index.htm

    Here are some old jerseys:
    NT jersey from 1939, this remained almost the same until 1948 when the lion came in
    http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/paidat/eka.htm
    NT jersey from 1950, with the lion
    http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/mjpaita.htm
    NT jersey from 1974, different color scheme
    http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/paidat/vellu.htm
    NT jersey from 1988, the first won medal in Calgary
    http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/paidat/okvaksi.htm
    NT jersey from 1995, you know why
    http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/paidat/juti.htm

    You can also find old Finnish club jerseys here: http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/villapaidat.htm
    And old NHL jerseys worn by Finns: http://www.tampere.fi/jaakiekkomuseo/nhl.htm
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    Hello you all!

    Karsten, you have really good basic knowledgement on Finnish hockey history!

    I think, that the following things were also crucial to the Finnish hockey's steps forward;

    1956: the first-ever Finnish hockey arena built in Tampere.

    1965: the first-ever Finnish full-roof arena, again in Tampere. For the WC tournament of the same year.

    Though my favourite team comes from Tampere (no, not Tappara!), I have to admire the club from the smallest SM-liiga town: Rauman Lukko.

    These days the population of Rauma is about 35,000. That is; they could fit into a suburb in Tampere.

    And yet they were able to gain the Finnish Championship in 1963!

    All the best
    Jukka

  6. #6
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Thanks Sharks, Shardik and Jukka.

    In the 1900s to 1960s Canadian people did much to promote the game in Europe. I have myself reported on how Canadian (and American) people helped to start the game in Norway and Sweden. How did they influence the development of hockey in Finland? And, more specifically, what's the story about the Canadian trophy that was introduced in the 1950s?

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    Hello Karsten!

    Right now I can only tell, that Kanada-Malja (The Canada Trophy) was donated to The Finnish Ice Hockey Federation by the Finnish Canadians. It was fetched to Finland from Canada by our sports-all-a-rounder of the time, Lauri Pihkala. His nickname was "Tahko".

    The first Canadian team visiting Finland was Sudbury Wolves, the Team Canada of 1949. Finland lost only by 4-5. But to be fair, in the after-war Finland, the conditions were not that great in Helsinki!

    All the best
    Jukka

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    Excellent article, Karsten. I very much enjoyed reading it.

    Couple of minor corrections, though (out of national pride, I guess...) and additions:

    Quote Originally Posted by Karsten View Post
    Finland never recorded an official victory over the Soviet Union, and the Finnish national team only beat USSR twice in 95 inofficial games (the first victory was recorded in 1976, the second as late as 1990).
    Finland did record an official victory over the Soviet Union:

    Winter Olympics 1988, Calgary, Canada, Feb 28, 1988, Finland - Soviet Union 2 - 1

    Other than that, in unofficial games there were four more wins with the first in 1971 (at least according to my records):

    Izvestia Tournament, Moscow, Soviet Union, Dec 17, 1971, Soviet Union - Finland 2 - 4
    Friendly, Helsinki, Finland, Jan 22, 1976, Finland - Soviet Union 5 - 3
    Izvestia Tournament, Moscow, Soviet Union. Dec 17, 1986, Soviet Union - Finland 2 - 3
    Friendly, Helsinki, Finland, Mar 29, 1990 , Finland - Soviet Union 5 - 4

    All in all, not that great a record against the almighty Soviet Union.

    GP: 142 Wins: 5 Draws: 6 Losses: 131 GF: 276 GA: 909

    Finland have done much better against Russia...


    Quote Originally Posted by Shardik View Post
    Great posts, Karsten! Very interesting reading. Although Finland's first victory wasn't against Latvia but Estonia.
    Correct.

    Helsinki, Finland, Feb 20, 1937, Finland - Estonia 2 - 1

    Interestingly, Estonia beat Finland a year later by the same score line. And yet a year later, in 1939, Finland again beat Estonia, this time 9-1, those three games remaining the only A-nationals between the two countries.

    Finland didn't play Latvia until 1992. 6-3 win in a friendly in Tampere, Finland.

  9. #9
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Thanks for your corrections, Calvin. Much appriaciated.

    I relied on this
    http://forums.internationalhockey.ne...0&postcount=34

    Shardik, maybe you could fix it?

    Here's another question: Before WWI, LIGH organised three European Championships (1912, 1913, 1914) which also counted as a sort of World Championship. Germany, represented by Berliner Schlittschuhclub, won the championship in 1912 and 1913, and featured a Finn, Johan Ollus. As you can see, Ollus was not only a Finnish pioneer of hockey, he is also the only Finn who have won the world championship twice.

    Do you have more info on him? What's his story?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsten View Post
    2 January 1978 - 30 years ago - was a historical day in Finland. At this day, the Finnish U18 team took home not only the first hockey gold, the European Championship, for Finland, but also Finland's first gold in any team sport! In the final, Finland beat the Soviet Union 6-5 after a thriller of a game that went on OT and even sudden-death! The decisive goal was scored by a player who turned out to be one of Finland's best ever: Jari Kurri (picture of the historic goal will be uploaded).
    Forgot to comment on this one. What a game that was! The best of all, I was there (as a ten year old). One of the best memories I have from my childhood, and still easily the best game I have ever seen live. If my memory serves right, at that time they played two 10min overtime periods followed by the third, the sudden death period.

    And if anyone have the stats from this game, I would be very interesting to see the times goals were scored. Again, if my memory serves right, Finland's equalizers (Finland were never up in this game until the sudden death goal by Jari Kurri) were always seconds from the final whistle.

    It was a full house: probably because the tickets were distributed by supermarkets. I think the deal was to buy worth FIM200 (whatever that would be worth now) and get two tickets for the final: I guess nobody expected Finland to reach the final (FIHA must have been kicking themselves at the end... :-)

  11. #11
    IHF Member Shardik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsten
    Thanks for your corrections, Calvin. Much appriaciated.

    I relied on this
    http://forums.internationalhockey.ne...0&postcount=34

    Shardik, maybe you could fix it?
    I am sorry but I don't understand what I am supposed to fix. Those records include all five Finnish victories over Soviet Union. I have one extra loss compared to Calvin's records and somewhat different goal totals but otherwise they look the same. BTW I have updated the records to include all Finnish NT games to date.

    Quote Originally Posted by Karsten
    Here's another question: Before WWI, LIGH organised three European Championships (1912, 1913, 1914) which also counted as a sort of World Championship. Germany, represented by Berliner Schlittschuhclub, won the championship in 1912 and 1913, and featured a Finn, Johan Ollus. As you can see, Ollus was not only a Finnish pioneer of hockey, he is also the only Finn who have won the world championship twice.

    Do you have more info on him? What's his story?
    Interesting to know. I had never heard of him before. I googled the name and found out that an engineer named Johan Ollus was the chairman of the board of Mokka Paahtimo Oy (presumably a coffee factory) founded in Finland in 1936. From another source name Johan Ollus is said to be the managing director (in 1930's) of Kimo iron works, a steel factory in Oravainen. This Ollus is said to have been born in 1886. The years seem to fit and the name isn't that common. Maybe these are all the same guy.

    Do you have a picture of him? Apparently a museum in Oravainen has a picture of a Johan Ollus, though unfortunately not online.
    "Lord Baelish, what you suggest is treason."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsten View Post
    Thanks for your corrections, Calvin. Much appriaciated.

    I relied on this
    http://forums.internationalhockey.ne...0&postcount=34

    Shardik, maybe you could fix it??
    Shardik, before you start putting major effort on this: with a quick review on those records I couldn't find major discrepanicies. The only difference was that I haven't counted Canada Cup/World Cup games as "official" games (even though I would want to, and I do consider those as "offical" but still in my records only WC and Olympic games are counted "official". There still sems to be one game difference in total - I seem to be missing one. Yet, I could not find it (a quick comparison). We seem to have all games counted for at least by my count (computer generated).

    So if you are counting by hand, please let me know. Either I am missing a game, or your hand count is one off.

  13. #13
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Thanks Shardik, my mistake.

    Well, let see if we can dig up a little more on Ollus. IMO, he deserves a place in the Legends of Hockey site.

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    IHF Member Shardik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvin Hobbes View Post
    Shardik, before you start putting major effort on this: with a quick review on those records I couldn't find major discrepanicies. The only difference was that I haven't counted Canada Cup/World Cup games as "official" games (even though I would want to, and I do consider those as "offical" but still in my records only WC and Olympic games are counted "official". There still sems to be one game difference in total - I seem to be missing one. Yet, I could not find it (a quick comparison). We seem to have all games counted for at least by my count (computer generated).

    So if you are counting by hand, please let me know. Either I am missing a game, or your hand count is one off.
    I have just double checked my calculations and they hold with the data that I have. I collected the results of the games from Marc's archives so I wouldn't be surprised if I was missing a game or two. But I don't see how I could have come up with an extra game. By my calculations there are 44 games played in IHWC's and Olympics (ie. your official games) and 99 other games. One of these should differ from your data. Judging by the goal difference you are missing a game that ended in a 16-3 victory for the Soviet Union. The problem is that my data doesn't have such a result at all. So not only do we have a different amount of games, some of the scores vary also...
    "Lord Baelish, what you suggest is treason."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shardik View Post
    I have just double checked my calculations and they hold with the data that I have. I collected the results of the games from Marc's archives so I wouldn't be surprised if I was missing a game or two. But I don't see how I could have come up with an extra game. By my calculations there are 44 games played in IHWC's and Olympics (ie. your official games) and 99 other games. One of these should differ from your data. Judging by the goal difference you are missing a game that ended in a 16-3 victory for the Soviet Union. The problem is that my data doesn't have such a result at all. So not only do we have a different amount of games, some of the scores vary also...
    I found the "extra game" from your data compared to mine: that would be a one I counted as a game against CIS just before the 1992 Olympics:

    Nissan Cup, Rapperswil, Switzerland, Feb 2, 1992, CIS - Finland 6 - 3

    That's 6-3, so now we only need to find 10 more goals for Soviet Union... :-)

  16. #16
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    Hello Karsten!

    Thanks for presenting Johan Ollus! To my knowledge also a former member of The Finnish Olympic Committee, Erik von Frenckell, did play hockey for one game in France 1926.

    Also, according to some sources, Finland was thinking about participating to the European Championship of 1929 Budapest, but withdrew for som reason.

    All the best
    Jukka

  17. #17
    IHF Member yardbird's Avatar
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    Sorry Karsten but I must correct you on one thing. Finland's first victory in an international game came against Estonia in 1937 (2-1), not Latvia. Finland didn't play against Latvia until 1992 when Finland won over Latvia in a friendly game (6-3) in Tampere.

    Otherwise a brilliant article about Finnish ice-hockey.

  18. #18
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yardbird View Post
    Sorry Karsten but I must correct you on one thing. Finland's first victory in an international game came against Estonia in 1937 (2-1), not Latvia. Finland didn't play against Latvia until 1992 when Finland won over Latvia in a friendly game (6-3) in Tampere.
    Thanks Y, I think this has been mentioned af few times.

    Couldnt find anything futher on Johan(nes) Ollus, other than he is a member of the German Ice Hockey Hall of Fame. I'm sure their collection have much more info on him.

  19. #19
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    IIHF

    Quote Originally Posted by Karsten View Post
    Here's another question: Before WWI, LIGH organised three European Championships (1912, 1913, 1914) which also counted as a sort of World Championship. Germany, represented by Berliner Schlittschuhclub, won the championship in 1912 and 1913, and featured a Finn, Johan Ollus. As you can see, Ollus was not only a Finnish pioneer of hockey, he is also the only Finn who have won the world championship twice.

    Do you have more info on him? What's his story?
    Karsten,

    I saw your message on the board about Johannes 'Johan' Ollus.



    Aside from what's been said already, here's some more background.
    Ollus was certainly a Finnish ice hockey pioneer.

    The moustached Ollus was quite small in stature, but was described as a speed demon
    who loved to rush with the puck.
    He was born in Vöyri, Finland on January 8, 1886 and died in Vöyri on
    December 26,1939 at the age of 53. (Vöyri is near Vasa).

    He was a forward and rover early on, but later shifted to defense.
    Ollus played his club hockey for the German club Berliner SC between 1911-14.
    He became a German champion in 1912 when his Berliner SC beat
    SC Charlottenburg 2-1 in a dramatic game that ended after three overtimes.

    With Berliner SC he also managed to win the Ringhoffer Pokal twice, where
    BSC once again beat SCC (5-1) in 1913 and Slavia Prague (10-2) in 1914.

    Ollus most significant appearances came in the first three
    LIHG tournaments (Probably the most prestigious tournament in Europe at that time)

    Ollus was representing Germany. (majority of players from BSC)

    His first appearance in the LIHG tournament came in 1912, held in Brussels.
    Ollus was in great form and played well from his rover position.
    Germany managed to win all four games, shocking the strong
    Oxford Canadians 9-8 in their opening game.

    Ollus was scoreless in that game as well as the next one against
    Belgium (8-4), but then Ollus scored 2 goals against Switzerland (11-3)
    and the game winner against France (3-0).

    Then a year after that during the second LIHG tournament held in St.Moritz,
    he played as a backup for the Swede Nils Molander on the German team.
    Ollus played in the two last games, against Switzerland (13-0) and England (2-1).
    He was held scoreless in both games but helped Germany win the tournament
    once again.

    In the third LIHG tournament, held in Chamonix 1913, Germany finished second.
    Ollus played as a defenseman and did not score in three games.

    His family still have all of his his medals.

    As you probably know there were some other Finns in Europe at that time.
    Germany had Tikkanen (ASC Dresden 1909) and speed skater Horn (SC Charlottenburg 1914).
    France had Helsinki-born Björk (Club des Patineurs de Paris II 1914) who lived in Paris.
    These guys were however not in Ollus class.

  20. #20
    IHF Member Karsten's Avatar
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    Excellent, BO, thanks for registering and helping us out on this important piece in the jigsaw puzzle of Finish hockey history.

  21. #21
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    Hello Bobby Orr!

    Excellent, there seems to be a lot more Finnish hockey pioneers than one might expect!

    All the best
    Jukka

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvin Hobbes View Post
    Forgot to comment on this one. What a game that was! The best of all, I was there (as a ten year old). One of the best memories I have from my childhood, and still easily the best game I have ever seen live. If my memory serves right, at that time they played two 10min overtime periods followed by the third, the sudden death period.

    And if anyone have the stats from this game, I would be very interesting to see the times goals were scored. Again, if my memory serves right, Finland's equalizers (Finland were never up in this game until the sudden death goal by Jari Kurri) were always seconds from the final whistle.
    Indeed, at the end the 20-minute overtime period (or 2x10 as they changed sides after 10 minutes as in 3rd period at that time), the equalizer from Juha Huikari came 15 seconds before the end, with Finnish goalie pulled off.
    http://www.hockeyarchives.info/U-18_1978.htm
    That's the way it crumbles, cookie-wise

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Indeed, at the end the 20-minute overtime period (or 2x10 as they changed sides after 10 minutes as in 3rd period at that time), the equalizer from Juha Huikari came 15 seconds before the end, with Finnish goalie pulled off.
    http://www.hockeyarchives.info/U-18_1978.htm
    You wouldn't happen to have the full stats would you? The 3-3 equalizer in the third period came pretty late as well. Again, if my memory serves me right it was Timo Blomqvist with a slap shot from a meter or so into the Soviet defence zone a few seconds before the final whistle.

  24. #24
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    Tell, please, about hockey tean of the Finnish Working Sporting Union (Työväen Urheiluliitto). It was play some games in USSR at 1960s
    1959/60
    Trud (Penza) - TUL - 5:3
    Trud (Ulyanovsk) - TUL - 3:1, 4:3
    Krasnoe Znamya (Ryazan) - TUL - 10:5
    1963/64
    Khimik (Ryazan) - TUL - 6:1
    1966/67
    SK imeni Uritskogo (Kazan) - TUL - ???
    SK imeni Uritskogo#2 (Kazan) - TUL - ???
    Dizelist (Penza) - TUL - ???
    Stankostroitel (Ryazan) - TUL - 3:2
    I interest an article about this games

  25. #25
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    Hello demon!

    Probably the most players of the FWSU team were from a Tampere club called KooVee (also known as Tampereen Kilpa-Veljet).

    They were the Finnish national champions in 1968.

    The main problem with them was probably Tampere being The Montreal of Finnish hockey. So, they were most of the time "The Third Tampere Team".

    Had they been somewhere else, even in Helsinki, they would probably be as legendary as the two other Tampere clubs: Ilves and Tappara.

    All the best
    Jukka

  26. #26
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    Thank you, Jukka
    At 1959/60 it was a united team from 8 towns. Chiefs - Aare Salokangas & Penti (or Kalevi) Puolakka, players Seppo Laaksonen (c), Jorma Kejnanen, Vejko Miklonen, Rejni Mikkonen, Mustonen, Tamminen (g). At 1963/64 it was a team from Turku. Have you any info about it or this players?

  27. #27
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    Hello Demon!

    Jorma Keinänen played in Kalpa in SM-sarja the 1958-59 season.

    There was Martti Mustonen in HPK (a Hämeenlinna club) in the 1959-60 season.

    Keijo Tamminen played in Vesa (Töölö, a suburb belonging to Helsinki) in the 1955-61 seasons.

    So, one sure and two maybes!

    Strange enough, none of them from the FWSU clubs!


    All the best
    Jukka

  28. #28
    IHF Member Shardik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by demon View Post
    Thank you, Jukka
    At 1959/60 it was a united team from 8 towns. Chiefs - Aare Salokangas & Penti (or Kalevi) Puolakka, players Seppo Laaksonen (c), Jorma Kejnanen, Vejko Miklonen, Rejni Mikkonen, Mustonen, Tamminen (g). At 1963/64 it was a team from Turku. Have you any info about it or this players?
    Maybe this Turku team is TuTo or Turun Toverit (Turku Camrades). As I understand it was a workman's sport club originally.
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  29. #29
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    Hello Shardik!

    Not a bad guess.

    I just noticed Aarre Salokangas was one of the persons working with a football junior league (Nappulaliiga) in Turku in the 1970s.

    All the best
    Jukka

  30. #30
    IHF Member yardbird's Avatar
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    Here's a picture from the game Finland-Estonia 20th February 1937. Finland won the game 2-1. It was Finland's first victory in an international game and Estonia's first international game ever.


    Estonia in dark (blue) jerseys and Finland in white. Note that the Finnish goalie seem to have been moer and less left out of the picture.

    I got this picture from a book called "Jäähoki" which I bought in Estonia on a visit there.

  31. #31
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    Hello Yardbird!

    A good photo, indeed!

    Just wondering; does anyone know, which trophy/trophies there might have been before "Canada malja" for the Finnish Champion?!

    All the best
    Jukka

  32. #32
    IHF Member Honkanen's Avatar
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    This isn't so important but:

    • TPS Turku (7). 1976, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1999, 2000, 2001

    TPS have won championship also at 1993 and 1995 so TPS have 9 championship.

    Also thanks for Karsten! Looking good.

  33. #33
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    Hello you all!

    There was an interesting discussion about the development of Finnish hockey on the "Team Denmark 1949!" thread, so I thought to add some points about it to this thread.

    So, internationally;

    1939; This was the very first time for Finland to participate to a World Championship tournament. The beginning was rough, losing by 1-12 vs. Germany.

    However, a sports encyclopaedia called "Urheilumme kasvot" (The face of our sports) reports about the game Finland vs. US: "It would'nt have been surprising , if Finland would have lead by 3-0 after ten minutes. Bad luck with shooting at the goal (for example, two shots on the poles of the cage) and the brilliant game by goalie Maki prevented the big suprise of the tournament to come true. However, the game was so even with the teams, that still in the last half of the third period the US was only leading by 0-1. Then the routine of the US team started to show up and the game was lost by 0-4."
    Some other sources have claimed the Finnish-speaking american player called Saari to have been placed next to the Finnish team on the bench. But without any confirmation this can be considered as an urban legend.
    In general, the game vs. the US can be considered as pure beginner's luck.

    The next more startling moment was before the 1949 pre-WC game vs. Canada. My commentary about the game can be read in an earlier post on this thread. The greatest achievement in the World Championsip tournament in Stockholm by Team Finland was a victory over Belgium by 17-2, in pool B.

    1951-58; This period of time can be put in a nutshell the following way; Finland was struggling to get the post of nr. 6 in the World Championships and the Olympic tournaments. Mainly with West-Germany and in the beginning of the decade with Norway too. Switzerland started its set of international performances as brilliantly as before, but started gradually to decline as a hockey nation during this period of time.

    1959; The Prague tournament was the first really startling moment for Finland. In the qualification group Finland played a tied game vs. Sweden by 4-4. Maybe this moment can be regarded as a birth of Sweden as "Our dear enemy", like a Finnish saying goes. However, this can also be regared as a beginning of Finland's "One big game, then nothing" period, lasting for a very, very long time.

    1960-1969; This period had an awkward beginning. Finland faced once again financial problems with the hockey team. So, the money to the Olympic trip came too late and the jet-lag took its toe in the most crucial game vs. West-Germany. Ending up to the pool B, the only achievements being the biggest victory ever (19-2 vs. Australia) and getting more goals than allowing ones for the first time.

    And then, again, a startling moment in our first domestic tournament in Tampere 1965. A tied game vs. Sweden by 2-2. After this one there was a win over Czechoslovakia by 3-1 in Vienna 1967 and a win over Canada by 5-2 in Grenoble 1968.

    But in general, Finland made routine performances by a mediocre pool A team.

    1970s-1980s: this period of time has been discussed pretty properly on the "Team Denmark 1949!" thread, I guess.

    Except; like usausa told on the thread, 1978 Finland gained its first gold. The team including Jari Kurri.

    However, this was the beginning about the following issue; How come our U-20 and U-18 teams can get medals and our men's team doesn't?

    The debate lasted til Calgary 1988.

    All right, I hope the discussion will go on!

    All the best
    Jukka

  34. #34
    IHF Member SharksAttack's Avatar
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    Finnish Champions

    Men:

    Ilves Tampere 16 (36, 37, 38, 45, 46, 47, 50, 51, 52, 57, 58, 60, 62, 66, 72, 85)
    TBK/Tappara Tampere 14 (53, 54, 55, / 59, 61, 64, 75, 77, 79, 82, 84, 86, 87, 88, 03)
    TPS Turku 10 (56, 76, 89, 90, 91, 93, 95, 99, 00, 01)
    HIFK Helsinki 6 (69, 70, 74, 80, 83, 98)
    Jokerit Helsinki 6 (73, 92, 94, 96, 97, 02)
    Kärpät Oulu 5 (81, 04, 05, 07, 08)
    HJK Helsinki 3 (29, 32, 35)
    KIF Helsinki 3 (39, 41, 43)
    Karhut/Ässät Pori 3 (65, / 71, 78)
    HSK Helsinki 2 (33, 34)
    Tarmo Hämeenlinna 2 (48, 49)
    HPK Hämeenlinna 1 (06)
    JYP Jyväskylä 1 (09)
    KooVee Tampere 1 (68)
    Lukko Rauma 1 (63)
    Reipas Viipuri 1 (28)
    RU-38 Pori 1 (67)
    TaPa Tampere 1 (31)

    Women:

    Blues Espoo 10 (99, 00, 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 07, 08, 09)
    Ilves Tampere 9 (85, 86, 87, 88, 90, 91, 92, 93, 06)
    Shakers Kerava 3 (94, 95, 96)
    HJK Helsinki 2 (83, 84)
    JYP Jyväskylä 2 (97, 98)
    EVU Vantaa 1 (89)

    A-Jun.:

    Ilves Tampere 21 (45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 52, 53, 60, 61, 66, 67, 74, 76, 77, 78, 81, 82, 91, 93, 94, 05)
    TBK/Tappara Tampere 15 (51, 54, / 56, 57, 59, 62, 63, 65, 68, 72, 73, 75, 86, 01, 04)
    HIFK Helsinki 4 (83, 84, 87, 03)
    Jokerit Helsinki 4 (88, 96, 99, 00)
    K-Espoo/Blues Espoo 3 (89, 90, / 09)
    JYP Jyväskylä 3 (95, 97, 06)
    TPS Turku 3 (69, 92, 98)
    Kärpät Oulu 2 (79, 85)
    SaiPa Lappeenranta 2 (70, 02)
    KalPa Kuopio 1 (08)
    Karhu-Kissat Helsinki 1 (50)
    KooVee Tampere 1 (71)
    KuPS Kuopio 1 (55)
    Lukko Rauma 1 (58)
    Pelicans Lahti 1 (07)
    Tarmo Hämeenlinna 1 (64)
    Ässät Pori 1 (80)

    B-Jun.:

    Ilves Tampere 7 (73, 78, 79, 80, 82, 90, 06)
    Tappara Tampere 5 (83, 85, 94, 95, 96)
    HIFK Helsinki 4 (89, 91, 05, 09)
    Jokerit Helsinki 4 (76, 99, 02, 08)
    JYP Jyväskylä 4 (81, 92, 98, 07)
    TPS Turku 4 (97, 01, 03, 04)
    K-Espoo Espoo 2 (88, 93)
    FoPS Forssa 2 (77, 84)
    Kärpät Oulu 2 (86, 00)
    Karhu-Kissat Helsinki 1 (87)
    KooVee Tampere 1 (72)
    Lukko Rauma 1 (74)
    Ässät Pori 1 (75)

    C-Jun.:

    Jokerit Helsinki 7 (76, 77, 78, 97, 00, 06, 09)
    Ilves Tampere 5 (72, 74, 82, 01, 04)
    Kärpät Oulu 5 (75, 85, 91, 92, 08)
    Tappara Tampere 5 (80, 84, 94, 95, 98)
    HIFK Helsinki 4 (86, 99, 03, 07)
    TPS Turku 4 (73, 90, 93, 02)
    EPS Espoo 1 (88)
    FoPS Forssa 1 (83)
    HJK Helsinki 1 (81)
    JYP Jyväskylä 1 (79)
    Jäähonka Espoo 1 (87)
    KalPa Kuopio 1 (96)
    Lukko Rauma 1 (89)
    Ässät Pori 1 (05)

    Combined:

    Ilves Tampere 16+9+21+7+5=58
    TBK/Tappara Tampere 14+0+15+5+5=39
    TPS Turku 10+0+3+4+4=21
    Jokerit Helsinki 6+0+4+4+7=21
    HIFK Helsinki 6+0+4+4+4=18
    K-Espoo/Blues Espoo 0+10+3+2+0=15
    Kärpät Oulu 5+0+2+2+5=14
    JYP Jyväskylä 1+2+3+4+1=11
    HJK Helsinki 3+2+0+0+1=6
    Karhut/Ässät Pori 3+0+1+1+1=6
    Lukko Rauma 1+0+1+1+1=4
    KIF Helsinki 3+0+0+0+0=3
    Tarmo Hämeenlinna 2+0+1+0+0=3
    KooVee Tampere 1+0+1+1+0=3
    Shakers Kerava 0+3+0+0+0=3
    FoPS Forssa 0+0+0+2+1=3
    HSK Helsinki 2+0+0+0+0=2
    SaiPa Lappeenranta 0+0+2+0+0=2
    Karhu-Kissat Helsinki 0+0+1+1+0=2
    KalPa Kuopio 0+0+1+0+1=2
    HPK Hämeenlinna 1+0+0+0+0=1
    Reipas Viipuri 1+0+0+0+0=1
    RU-38 Pori 1+0+0+0+0=1
    TaPa Tampere 1+0+0+0+0=1
    EVU Vantaa 0+1+0+0+0=1
    KuPS Kuopio 0+0+1+0+0=1
    Pelicans Lahti 0+0+1+0+0=1
    EPS Espoo 0+0+0+0+1=1
    Jäähonka Espoo 0+0+0+0+1=1

  35. #35
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    Anyone out there know who the coaches were for these teams or where the information may be found.

    1975-76
    Sport Vaasa
    KooVee Tampere
    1976-77
    KooVee Tampere
    1977-78
    KooVee Tampere
    1978-79
    KooVee Tampere
    1979-80
    KooVee

  36. #36
    IHF Member SharksAttack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JEFF M View Post
    Anyone out there know who the coaches were for these teams or where the information may be found.

    1975-76
    Sport Vaasa Matti Ruohonen
    KooVee Tampere Tapio Kauppinen
    1976-79
    KooVee Tampere Kaj Matalamäki
    1979-80
    KooVee Pekka Uitus
    Source: Liigatähdet, Ari Mennander & Pasi Mennander, Gummerus 2004
    ISBN 951-20-6684-x

  37. #37
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    SharksAttack,

    Thank you so much for the information.

    Jeff

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